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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally, funds are going to allow me hopefully by christmas to purchase a new tv. I just had a quick question about ISF. If i decided to get a rptv do i have to get it isf calibrated or is there someway to do it myself. my question is not subjective..... If it is highly reccomended then I doubt i'll will get it. I'm a college student so purchasing and nice rptv is already squeezing the wallet enough with my budget of 2800 - 3000.


i appreciate all those who respond. I tried to search for what i was looking for exactly but couldn't come up with and exact answer.


thanks
 

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Some sets are better out of the box than others, and most people will let the set settle in a while, do the convergence and small tweaks themselves, then do the AVIA or Video Essentials calibrations. (I think most sets have a break in period, so it may be necessary to do these a few times, then periodically.)


Most people who've had an ISF calibration done swear by it. This is not something you can do by yourself, it takes speciail equipment and training.


But, you don't NEED to have it done. Do some searches and you'll find brands that are good out of the box, and others that really only shine after a good ISF treatment. But this is all subjective. It all depends on what you think looks good. If you like it in the showroom, you'll probably like it at home. Showroom sets are not calibrated much, they just crank up the brightness and contrast, and it's a totally different viewing environment than home usually, although some places like Tweeter will have nice "livingroom" type areas to watch some sets.


So I guess the bottom line is, no you don't need ISF, but you need to evaluate the cost/benefit of getting one, in the context of how happy you are with the set you have, after you've done all you can do to it.

Consider it the "next level" of performance after that. Depending on the person and the set, you may think it looks 1) pretty much the same, 2) looks a little better 3) looks a lot better 4) OMG is this the same set?


Shawn
 

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Shawn provided some very good advice. BTW - you can get a great CRT RPTV (55" Mitsu) for about $2K and a quality ISF calibration for ~ $400. Total cost is well under most LCD/DLP RPTVs.


On the other hand - you can do the basic tweaks yourself, plus AVIA/VE and add the ISF calibration down the road. I had mine calibrated after owning it for over a year. I felt like I got a new TV for $400. Good feeling.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool.... You all pretty much summed up what i was thinking. I'm trying to budget my money accordingly.


My only other issue is - I am a gaming fanatic. I love playing games so that is a huge concern. XBOX Live controls me - especially with ESPN football (I highly reccomend everyong pick this up if you enjoy football in the slightest). So I envision myself setting in front of my set for countless hours - not studying - playing online football.


perhaps I should start another thread for this - but are some crt rptv's better for gaming than others? I know I won't have this issue with DLP or LCD ( I could afford the much discussed pany 50 LCD rptv) but overall picture quality is important. And probably the wildest thing of all - this TV is going into a studio apartment :D
 

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I'd Check over in the Home Theater Gaming section. Some TV's accept and display 720p signals from gaming systems, some upconvert. I have no idea what's considered best though (for gaming picture quality).


Shawn
 
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