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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to thank everyone here for their advice on building my theater. I have a functional if not finished space. When I turn on a film, can't believe I built it myself. Just drywall, sound treatments, and carpet left. Thanksgiving is the target date.


Have a look:

http://www.chriswhitworth.com/hometheater.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They have stores in the East and on the West Coast mainly.
 

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Not intending to put down your construction, just pointing out a couple of things.


Why did you build the risers before drywalling? Sound can travel through the riser and into the wall if the walls are not done first and the riser spaced from the wall. Also, are you planning 1 row or 2 rows of seats? If two, you don't really need a step all the way across the front of the riser.


If you want to paint that DIY drop pole and flange later, wipe it down with either vinegar or rubbing alcohol. That will get rid of any oil coating they used and it should paint fairly easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the comments.


No particular reason for the sequence of construction other than I hate drywall and have put it off. Also, as I alluded in one of the pages, I really wanted to see how everything was going to fit in real as opposed to on paper.


As far as the excess step across the front. By using 10' and 8' boards, I didn't have to cut them at all. Took less than an hour to frame it up. Thought about having a second row of seats on the riser, so wanted to provide a way to get up from the side. Also, I think it looks better to have the upper level recessed on two sides rather than just one. If there is going to be seats back there, they will be the "overflow" seating. I will wind up with either 4 more IKEA seats for two rows of three, or maybe one more for a row of three along the bottom and a sofa on the top. Or vice versa. We'll see.


What do you think about this? Had an idea for the AV rack. Either buy or build a rack that is freestanding. Make sure it is open to the back. Suspend it off the floor slightly by attaching a piano hinge along the (in my case) left edge, allowing the whole thing to swing out for ease of access to connections and so forth. Anyone tried something like that?


I hear what you are saying re sound traveling through the riser. Not a huge concern of mine. In this house there is only my wife and myself. Kids and grandkids are certainly who are the intended visitors. I have cranked the system up quite loud. Directly above is my office. I can obvioulsly hear something going on down below when I am in there, but it's not tremendously intrusive. More sound leaves through the back where the white door is. That in turn opens to another storage room about the same size as the theater. The door to that room is at the bottom of the stairs going up to the kitche/family room. The door is frequently open and a lot of sound does travel up that way. Sealing off the door to the HVAC area will certainly help out there.


My goal was not to have this room completely isolated. I would have been planning on doulble ceilings and offset stud walls and so forth if that were the case. I am going to address what seems to be a huge source of sound escaping - holes and gaps in the wall and ceilings. I am guessing that my ROI on the liberal and careful use of acoustic sealant will be higher than a poorly sealed but generously insulated space.


The whole PJ mount is coming down and will be black when everything is finished. Thanks for the tip on de-greasing it.


It has been tremendously interesting to do this. Projects that I put off because I was unfamiliar with them or in my case hadn't done them recently turned out to be the most fun. Classic case was the 110V wiring. Had re-wired my first house about 15 years ago, but hadn't really done much since. Bought a guide at HD to re-acquaint myself with code and basic circuit theory. Turned out to be a snap.


Funny the stuff you overlook. I used 14 ga. for the ceiling cans and sconces, but 12 ga for the plugs which are on their own circuit. From my past experience, I knew that the plugs have quick connect terminals on the back where you can just push the romex in. Unfortunately, it will only take up to 14 ga. So instead of just jamming the wires into the outlets, I wound up having to wrap the 12 ga. around the terminal screws. Took at least three times longer. In hindsight, given the minimal load and the dedicated nature of the circuit, should have just wired the whole room in 14ga.


Who knows, maybe I will find drywall to be more fun than I remember when my dad made me help him while I was in college and he was finishing off a garage.
 

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Actually, in the long run you may be happy that you used 12 ga and had to use the screw terminals. I don't trust the "push in" friction type.


For $2000 you did a great job with a fantastic ROI. Just goes to show that there are many ways to create an enjoyable theater.


Concerning the piano hinge..... I've seen it done however the equipment rack will be fairly deep and therefore you would need a big opening on the side opposite the piano hinge to allow for the swinging of the deep shelves. A better solution might be a combination of a piano hinge and a set of slides so that you can pull out the rack first and then swing it freely on the piano hinge.


Good luck... Thanksgiving looks do-able!
 
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