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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone tried acoustic paints such as this one:
http://www.hytechsales.com/prod150.html


They claim:
Quote:
Acousti-Coat is a heavy bodied, water based flat latex paint formulated with ceramic microspheres and sound absorbing fillers.

Acousti-Coat is for use on interior surfaces including drywall ceilings and walls, plaster, primed metal and wood.

The combination of a high loading of the Ceramic Microspheres with their vacuum centers and the soft pigment fillers tends to absorb sound and prevent it from bouncing off the surface.

This product is an easy to apply surface coating with better than average sound absorbing properties than regular paint.

Acousti-Coat is the ideal paint for interior ceilings, the very high concentration of insulating ceramics and other pigments adds a high reflective heat barrier to the painted surface. The small texture also helps in hiding surface defects such as drywall joints, dings and dents.


Benefits:

Excellent insulating and sound dampening characteristics.

Fast drying

Dampens ringing and tinning noise in metal structures

Environmentally friendly

Soap and Water Cleanup

Able to be painted over

Non toxic

Application: Apply by Brush, Roller or Spray with hopper spray gun

Add Flame Guard for Class "A" or Class "B" Fire rating
If it works well, might be the thing for HT theater ceilings that have living spaces above.


What do you think?
 

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Jon,


I never heard of that paint, but these statements really set off my BS detector: "The combination of a high loading of the Ceramic Microspheres with their vacuum centers and the soft pigment fillers..."


There's no free lunch. I don't believe a thin coat of paint could compare with even 1/2 inch of acoustic foam, let alone work as well as "real" acoustic damping material like 2 to 4 inches of rigid fiberglass. A special paint may be able to absorb a little at the very highest frequencies. But it's not physically possible for a thin material to offer meaningful absorption at the important frequencies.


--Ethan
 

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Well...all it says is "better than average sound absorbing properties than regular paint". That, I guess, could be true but like Ethan said...how much is it really going to buy you for $31(!) a gallon? A thin material cannot absorb low frequencies which are the main ones running through your house.
 

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Oh...and one more thing...note there are no absorption numbers published. It does say that it "dampens tinging and ringing noises" which points to very high frequencies only.


They don't seem to be lying...just over-hyping.
 

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Well I think that would be nice. This one http://www.quietcoat.com also seems almost too good to be true.


Does anyone have any experience with this? I don't even think they mention the color of it but if you are supposed to put it under the hood or into wheelbarrels it's probably blackish. It might work to some degree by absorbing the surface vibration rather than actually blocking soundwaves. Although that's not a very scientific explanation I am trying to give since soundwaves cause vibration in the first place.


Who knows?


Till
 

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Ethan, what do they use on the side walls in commercial theaters for sound control? It appears it is insulation covered by grille cloth. I put my hand on it and it seems double layered. Could be 6" thick. Do you know?
 

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