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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received my shipment of GOM fabric and am ready to start building my acoustical panels. As with everything in a dedicated theater room I am learning that you cannot just think that you are doing something correctly... you have to correctly know what you are doing!!!

So I ask for help once again to make sure that I am doing my theater right. I am ready to build the panels and have read so many posts on you must put them here...no there...no everywhere. Some say the panels should encompass the entire room, others only as high as the ear level, some the room minus the rear walls......

I am not an audiophile and the language that is used is difficult for me to sometimes truly understand.

Can someone please sum up the absolute basics of how high to build the panels and where to place them.

I had thought of building the panels 2 X 4 size and mounting them at the reflection points. I also planned to cover the entire front wall around the screen, and place 2 on the back wall. Am I wrong in my thought process?

the room is 13'7" X 20'6" with an 8 ft ceiling. I am using a CRT projector and a 54 X 96 screen.

I have the entire Rocket Package for 7.1 (package #1) and the HSU sub.

I have plenty of fabric as I bought 20 yards.

Please help.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the site. It gives good suggestions on how to build the panels, but what I really need to know is what part of the room should I treat and what part not to. I have seen theaters where the entire room is treated, but I recently read a post that said that was not the ideal. I also read in the new Home Theater Builder Magazine that if you do not do these panels correctly and place them correctly it will actually worsen the sound in the room.
 

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It is not a good idea to treat all the walls with acoustically absorbent panels. This will result in acoustically "dead" room which will result in a very dry sound. Even recording studios are not acoustically dead.


The side wall panels should be located to absorb the first order reflectance of your speakers. Sit in your listening chair and have a friend stand with his/her back against the right side wall and holding a mirror with its back against their stomach. Have the person walk, with their back against the wall, along the wall until you see the image of the right speaker in the mirror. Mark this location on the wall with tape. Have the person continue walking until you see the left speaker in the mirror. Mark this location on the wall with tape. Repeat this procedure along the left wall. Place your acoustic wall panels where you have placed the tape on the walls. This will control first order reflectance. You can repeat this procedure on the ceiling.


Place some acoustic panels on the back wall, but don't cover the entire wall.


I would not recommend permanently fastening the panels to the walls until you are satisfied with the sound. Also consider spacing the panels about 2" to 4" out from the wall. This will help with controlling bass.
 

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I'm thinking what you are after is a commercial look that I see in office buildings a lot where the wall panels appear to have small reveals but the panels cover the entire wall area. I like this look. If so, you could make some panels reflective and some absorptive but they would all appear the same. You would do as above for the first order reflections and you could also make the bottom panels absorb sound as well. You would make above the bottom "live" panels.


Brian
 
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