AVS Forum banner

41 - 60 of 146 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
Added BB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
^^ There should be one list for technical terms and another for brand names/brand specific acronyms, eg ICE.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
^^ There should be one list for technical terms and another for brand names/brand specific acronyms, eg ICE.
You are suggesting separate sections for similar items; like sections for: AV Terms, Movies, Manufacturers, Products.

That idea has logical and orderly appeal. I like it.

On the other hand, it means users would have to search more than one list to find that term for which they are looking.

Don't know which is the best decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
You are suggesting separate sections for similar items; like sections for: AV Terms, Movies, Manufacturers, Products.

That idea has logical and orderly appeal. I like it.
It makes most sense to me, but a further suggestion would be to put them all in a spreadsheet alphabetically with a category and definition column. That way people can keep it to hand and search as required. Maybe add it to post #1 and update as required.

I dunno why you're still having difficulty with Xmax and Xmech/Xlim. The definitions I've already given for both are pretty much industry standard. I'll try again:
Xmax: the excursion limit beyond which the manufacturer has decided the drivers linear performance has degraded. It can be specified either by the total THD of the driver at that excursion exceeding a given value, usually 10%, or by a mechanical description of the magnetic motor. This is usually given as Xmax= [(winding depth - magnetic gap depth)/2] + (magnetic gap depth/3) or Xmax= [(winding depth - magnetic gap depth)/2]. One would need to either view the datasheet for the driver or ask the manufacturer which they have used.
Xmach/Xlim: The excursion which when exceed will likely cause permanent mechanical damage to the driver.

Same with Q: there's not a really pithy one sentence description for it that a non engineer would easily grok that is still technically accurate. The simplest is "the ratio of power stored vs the power dissipated per cycle in a filter" or "the ratio of the of effective resistance to reactance in a circuit". In audio it is most used to describe the bandwidth of a filter: the higher the number, the narrower than bandwidth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #45
I dunno why you're still having difficulty with Xmax and Xmech/Xlim....
  1. I really do appreciate your help. Thank you.
  2. I am a newbie.
  3. This is list is intended for newbies, who by definition are not technical.
  4. I intend for the explanations to be short and pithy (while still maintaining a large degree of accuracy)
  5. I have no source that explains what the acronyms letters stand for.
  6. Whoever came up with the terms XMAX and XLIM, IMHO got them bass-ackwards from implying their true meaning. I mean that the MAX of XMAX should mean MAXimum, as in the maximum driver can move before it hits a physical object - its maximum excursion. And I mean that LIM of XLIM should mean linear maximum as in the area where the driver is said to have a linear response. But is that what they mean? Nooooooooo!
  7. XMAX is "defined" differently by different manufacturers.
  8. Using terms like "linear" and "excursion" in the explanation just invites more questions (by newbies) about what they mean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #46
Added VS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #47
Added colors:
The color green means a manufacturer/retailer or a manufacturer/retailer related term.
The color red means a movie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
  1. I really do appreciate your help. Thank you.
  2. I am a newbie.
  3. This is list is intended for newbies, who by definition are not technical.
  4. I intend for the explanations to be short and pithy (while still maintaining a large degree of accuracy)
  5. I have no source that explains what the acronyms letters stand for.
  6. Whoever came up with the terms XMAX and XLIM, IMHO got them bass-ackwards from implying their true meaning. I mean that the MAX of XMAX should mean MAXimum, as in the maximum driver can move before it hits a physical object - its maximum excursion. And I mean that LIM of XLIM should mean linear maximum as in the area where the driver is said to have a linear response. But is that what they mean? Nooooooooo!
  7. XMAX is "defined" differently by different manufacturers.
  8. Using terms like "linear" and "excursion" in the explanation just invites more questions (by newbies) about what they mean.
1: Thank you.
2: I understand that.
3: I understand this too, but you cannot sometimes define something complex in a simple one sentence answer.
4: See 3.
5: I understand this too, which is why I'm putting in the effort to explain them.
6: No they didn't. Xmax is the excursion limit you should use them to. You don't want them to be damaged just because you reach this limit. Xmech/Xlim is where the damage occurs. Analogy: red line in a motor. The bottom of the red area is here you should rev to (Xmax), but an occasional venture into the red zone is OK. Exceed the other side of the red zone (Xmech) and expect something to break as it wasn't designed to sustain those forces.

One story I use to explain this is when I had my PA. My midbass drivers (JBL2226) have an Xmax of 7.6mm which I tried never to exceed. Above this there was no damage but the sound got worse fast. At 25mm or so they reached their Xmech. There was no damage before this, but they sounded awful compared to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,179 Posts
Same with Q: there's not a really pithy one sentence description for it that a non engineer would easily grok that is still technically accurate. The simplest is "the ratio of power stored vs the power dissipated per cycle in a filter" or "the ratio of the of effective resistance to reactance in a circuit". In audio it is most used to describe the bandwidth of a filter: the higher the number, the narrower than bandwidth.
Linearity is easier to understand than Q, but would need maybe 200 words and some graphics to explain it clearly to someone who has no understanding of basic electronics.
Actually, you made Q very easy to understand. It took a bunch of trial and error for me to figure that out, and that's all the non-engineer needs to know. If they even care. Many will probably just take the numbers from REW and plug them into whatever device they're using, and get perfectly adequate results.

Of course, now you have me curious about where the power is stored and who came up with "Q".
But I'm strange that way. :D
Michael
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
Community thread to collect, and explain commonly used ACRONYMS which are listed, along with their meaning, and a "short, simple" explanation.

As this for the everyone's benefit, please....
Post what acronyms you need to understand.
Post what acronyms you know, but others might not know.
Post what acronyms you can decode.
Post what the best definition is.

I will update the second (or third) post with what you all think.

Reason for doing this - reading AVS I come across acronyms everyday that I don't know, and I don't want to interrupt the thread and appear a doffus for not knowing.
I appreciate your efforts to explain acronyms. I think the writing world would be better off if folks used a rule of grammar associated with acronyms. The first use is spelled out. Every use thereafter, use the acronym. Example: I am looking for a new audio video receiver (AVR); my old AVR does not have the latest technology. https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/21/

I give up on many of the postings on the audio video systems (AVS) forum, because some contributors use too many acronyms, and I get tired of looking them up. In addition to looking up the acronym, I also have to look up definitions of concepts which I can't always remember the next time I come across the acronym for the concept. Oh well that's just me.

I understand there is a portion of our audience who are comfortable using and translating acronym-speak. Many of those contributors are very knowledgeable, and those of us who don't speak the language (and it is a separate language) are unable to learn from them. Then again it is probably not their job to teach us anything. They might be here to speak only to those with the same linguistic skills.

Good job with this thread. You are performing a needed service.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
16,231 Posts
I like the color coding for different categories of acronyms altho don't think movies should be intermixed into a list of technical subject acronyms, plus you've got non-acronyms in the list as well. You could simply provide links for the lengthy explanations. Why recreate the whole movie list of acronyms when you could simply link a good existing one, like the one I pointed out in post number 12?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #52
I like the color coding for different categories of acronyms altho don't think movies should be intermixed into a list of technical subject acronyms, plus you've got non-acronyms in the list as well. You could simply provide links for the lengthy explanations. Why recreate the whole movie list of acronyms when you could simply link a good existing one, like the one I pointed out in post number 12?
I put your movie link at the top of the list. Thank you.
Any non-acronyms are there because they look like acronyms to someone who doesn't know getter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #53 (Edited)
Added:
RG
BLA

Improved some explanations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #54
Added PR - Pressure Response - but I need a good explanation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,822 Posts
Actually, you made Q very easy to understand. It took a bunch of trial and error for me to figure that out, and that's all the non-engineer needs to know.
Glad to be of assistance.

Of course, now you have me curious about where the power is stored and who came up with "Q".
But I'm strange that way. :D
Michael
Oddly enough, I found a very old paper explaining all of this when I made my previous posts. I scanned it quickly intending to read it in detail later, but I think it's what you're after. My home PC decided to have it's 6 monthly hissy fit last night and rebooted, so I don't have it any more, but I'd like it for my library, so when I get home I'll look and see if I can find it via my history, then post it or a link. The power is stored in the reactive components, but only for part of a cycle.
If not, I'll try to find a way to explain it in words, because it'd be easy if we were in the same room and I could use vector diagrams.

I've come up with a succinct explanation of linearity. If I can get through the meeting I'm about to go through without throwing myself off the balcony, I'll type it up later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #57
I have doubts that I have correctly explained HPF and LPF. Can someone please advise as to correcter and better and simpler explanations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,455 Posts
I have doubts that I have correctly explained HPF and LPF. Can someone please advise as to correcter and better and simpler explanations?
Here you go X:

http://www.rane.com/par-h.html#high_pass_filter

http://www.rane.com/par-l.html#low_pass_filter

The Rane Pro Audio Reference is an excellent source of acronyms and definitions.

If you want to, you can link directly to any individual entry by using the /par-[letter] and #[the_entry_name] format shown in the links above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,179 Posts
it'd be easy if we were in the same room and I could use vector diagrams.
It'd be easy for YOU. :D

Actually, I remember vectors. I doubt they've changed much in 30+ years.
But a link to that article would be great. ;)
Thanks for your efforts and contributions.

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #60
Added PSD (and no it is not "Powered Subwoofer Disorder - which is caused by listening to and/or experiencing too much low frequency, and is characterized by talking too much about subwoofers". But that "sickness" is real, eventhough it is not PSD. :rolleyes:)
 
41 - 60 of 146 Posts
Top