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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I want to evaluate the new windows 7 beta and create a separate partition, and be able to boot into either OS, is partition magic a program that would allow me to do this?


thanks,

ej
 

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win7 and vista can dual boot off the same boot partition. Without having two physical discs and switching their boot priority in bios I think just using the native bootloader is probably the best option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
what is the native bootloader? If I installl windows 7 on my :c drive, won't it format the disk? (sorry if I'm sounding naive!)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJ /forum/post/15571806


what is the native bootloader? If I installl windows 7 on my :c drive, won't it format the disk? (sorry if I'm sounding naive!)

All operating systems require a boot loader, it's the sectors on the disk that the bios points to that say load OS. The boot sector then hooks some files on the hard drive to start the booting process.


Windows 7 and windows vista can share the same boot loader. So if you have vista on C, you can install win7 on C select a fresh install (not upgrade) but still not format the c drive either (or even install it on to a seperate disk).


So the bootloader on C will come up and say do you want to boot from vista or windows 7.


My current setup I have a 750gb drive with a 50gb OS partition and 700gb of media and seperate 40GB drive I'm using for win7. My bios points to the 750gb drive, the bootloader comes up asks wich OS to start and then vista points to the OS files on the 50gb partition and win7 points to the 40gb drive, but they could've even shared a drive (Assuming i had enough space).
 

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This is what I've done.


1) Create an image of your current OS saved to another partition on the computer (I use the free version of Acronis which is compatible with W7)

2) Load W7 over your current OS (no, it doesn't format the partition, it actually stores the data from your prior OS, however that "old" data is not really usable.)

3) Go in and delete the "old" windows data that W7 saves (C:\\old windows).

4) Install Acronis on W7.

5) Create an image of the W7 build and save it to another partition on the computer.


It takes me a total of 6 minutes to restore an image to C:\\


When I want to play with W7, I restore that image. When I'm done playing, I restore the original OS image. Safe, quick, simple.


Notes:

Remember to keep taking new images of both your original OS and the W7 build as those OSes are changed or you will be returned to the point where the image was taken.

When you restore the W7 image, the first rebooted screen asks whether to start windows normally ... choose yes. Apparently something in W7 realizes it is a restored image and asks you to confirm.
 

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hmmmm I thought you could have them both on C, I may have been wrong on that.


In which case you would need to create a new partition before installing (Because if you've got the disks space to spare, selecting your OS via a boot loader is much more convenient than loading from an image).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti /forum/post/15572098


hmmmm I thought you could have them both on C, I may have been wrong on that.


In which case you would need to create a new partition before installing (Because if you've got the disks space to spare, selecting your OS via a boot loader is much more convenient than loading from an image).

I agree that for a long-term setup, a dual-boot is definitely the way to go. However with a potentially squirrelly beta OS that will explode in August ... managing boot loaders is more risk than I'm willing to take. Plus, it takes me 6 minutes to restore the W7 image. I bet it takes 4-5 minutes just to reboot into the other OS.


Plus, taking new images on your main OS as things change is a very good habit to get into. I'm very surprised that so many people here don't understand that.
 

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+1 for what sotti said;


Just load the win vista or win 7 beta dvd and add a 25+ GB partition from the free space on the HD assuming you have that which you should if your considering dual boot from the same drive. The MS bootloader will sort out the 2 OS's and give you a menu at startup.


Win 7 beta's expire in Aug 09....and that's somehow a negative? I think it's a great deal and it runs great, imo.


Cheers, Duder
 

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If you install W7 on your main C drive with your current windows and then decide you don't want W7, you end up getting stuck with 10-15gigs of W7 files that you can't delete, tried for about an hour to get rid of W7 on one of our machines since it wasn't running good on it. ended up moving the data files (W7 was installed on the D: partition) then formatting that partition to get rid of the W7 files and directories.


Using the partitions or Images would be the best way.
 
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