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I have a Pioneer AVR that everything runs through. It has an automatic speaker adjustment system; IE a mic and a program that tests speakers and sets sound levels. The speakers are small Cambridge ones, but not an "out of the box set" The front speaker is bigger than the others, but the AV test still sees them all as "small." The sound is not audiophile level, but generally OK for us. There is one problem though:


When watching sports, and some other things, the L & R forward speakers are too loud, so that is the crowd noise or drama music interferes with the announcers or people speaking. What is the best way too adjust this?


I could manually adjust what the automatic program the Pioneer sees, either by changing the "distance" the speakers are at. Or the decibels of output of the speakers. Or both. Is one preferable? Is there another better way?
 

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Originally Posted by feffer777  /t/1472388/adjusting-sound-in-a-5-1-setup#post_23305998

I have a Pioneer AVR that everything runs through. It has an automatic speaker adjustment system; IE a mic and a program that tests speakers and sets sound levels. The speakers are small Cambridge ones, but not an "out of the box set" The front speaker is bigger than the others, but the AV test still sees them all as "small." The sound is not audiophile level, but generally OK for us. There is one problem though:


When watching sports, and some other things, the L & R forward speakers are too loud, so that is the crowd noise or drama music interferes with the announcers or people speaking. What is the best way too adjust this?


I could manually adjust what the automatic program the Pioneer sees, either by changing the "distance" the speakers are at. Or the decibels of output of the speakers. Or both. Is one preferable? Is there another better way?

If certain speakers tend to overpower the system, drop their dBs and/or move them further away with the distance setting.


If certain speakers tend to get lost, raise their dBs and/or move them closer with the distance setting.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by feffer777  /t/1472388/adjusting-sound-in-a-5-1-setup#post_23305998

I have a Pioneer AVR that everything runs through. It has an automatic speaker adjustment system; IE a mic and a program that tests speakers and sets sound levels. The speakers are small Cambridge ones, but not an "out of the box set" The front speaker is bigger than the others, but the AV test still sees them all as "small." The sound is not audiophile level, but generally OK for us. There is one problem though:


When watching sports, and some other things, the L & R forward speakers are too loud, so that is the crowd noise or drama music interferes with the announcers or people speaking. What is the best way too adjust this?


I could manually adjust what the automatic program the Pioneer sees, either by changing the "distance" the speakers are at. Or the decibels of output of the speakers. Or both. Is one preferable? Is there another better way?

A quick question; if you run the "test tone" (under manual set up on the AVR menu), do the L & R forward speakers sound louder? This should tell you which way to go.


P.S. The Pioneer AVR is setting up your speakers correctly when it set them to "small".
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by feffer777  /t/1472388/adjusting-sound-in-a-5-1-setup#post_23305998

I have a Pioneer AVR that everything runs through. It has an automatic speaker adjustment system; IE a mic and a program that tests speakers and sets sound levels. The speakers are small Cambridge ones, but not an "out of the box set" The front speaker is bigger than the others, but the AV test still sees them all as "small."

welcome to the wonderful world of home theater manufacturer double speak. "small" does not mean the speakers are little. Actually "Small" simply means "turn on bass management (crossover to subwoofer) for this speaker or speaker group." So very often when the receiver sets the speakers to "large," it's doing the wrong thing. A competent subwoofer, especially if placed as well as one can, should be able to reproduce bass better than just about any mains, especially as you get things going louder. So the usual advice around here is mostly to set speakers to small. MOst recommend 80 Hz crossovers unless the autosetup set them higher . . . . Being a contarian, I think my fronts are crossed over at 60 Hz.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by feffer777  /t/1472388/adjusting-sound-in-a-5-1-setup#post_23305998


I could manually adjust what the automatic program the Pioneer sees, either by changing the "distance" the speakers are at. Or the decibels of output of the speakers. Or both. Is one preferable? Is there another better way?

Did you properly calibrate your setup with the microphone and your AVR's built-in calibration software? And are you sure you are properly decoding the source material with the AVR?


There are ways to improve your center speaker's performance. Is it on a shelf or in a bookcase? Near the floor? Aimed toward your ears' level? Simple changes that optimize its placement can make a difference.


If you need to boost the center's output level or lower the left's and right's (or do both), that is OK, within reason.


But do not alter the distance settings that the AVR sets for your speakers. Provided you performed the calibration correctly, and except in rare and extreme circumstances, AVR's are very good at setting these distances correctly. Changing the speaker distance that the AVR sets will only alter the relative delay between the speakers and will not address their relative output levels. It is very likely that altering those settings will only make matters worse. Honestly, I am kinda surprised that arnyk recommended doing that.
 
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