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My friend just bought a yamaha receiver for 199.99, but it has no svideo capabilities at all and no component out. Right now he just has the audio from his ps2 and audio from his tv in the receiver. His cable box and ps2 video are directly into the tv. He plans on getting a hdtv soon and I'm trying explain to him the need for component or svideo atleast, but he wants to keep it hooked up how it is, even with the big screen. What are the advantages of running his ps2 and cable box into the receiver through components, then components to the tv instead of hooking it up like he has it(everything but audio to the tv)?


I know component cables give you a better picture, but why run any video through the receiver at all? Why not just hook up the ps2 and cable box directly to the tv with component cables, instead of hooking them to the receiver? Then you could just connect your audio to the receiver.
 

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I think the main advantage of the reciever being used for video would be the ability to only have one set of video cables going IN to the tv. For example, with a capable reciever you could put your cable box on TV/Sat IN with its audio, then DVD on DVD IN, and PS2 on whatever other IN, and then with a flip of a switch, the video source coming out of the component OUT on the reciever would change, and be sent to the tv, whose signal would change. I've never used this set up, but seems like it'd be a bit more convenient then what i do, which is change my video source on my tv, and then switch to the matching source on the audio gear. As for the technical benefit, I don't believe there is any benefit to running your video into the reciever, it's just passing along the information and making things a bit easier.
 

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Yes. Using the receiver as a switching device to allow only one cable to the monitor/TV is the reason for the receiver being able to accept two and sometimes three signals and then outputing one signal to the monitor/TV. You can purchase just a device that does this type of switching rather than use a receiver for that purpose.
 

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Depends on the value of convenience versus ultimate performance (which you may not even notice).


Plugging video directly into the TV theoretically offers the best performance, but at the loss of convenience since you will have to switch the TV (or external video selector) AND the receiver to keep the audio and picture matched up.


Sure, a programmable remote with macros, etc, can remedy this issue, but it's just one more gadget to buy, set-up, and maintain.


If you are the only one "running the show" may not be a big deal, but if you have WAF, guests, kids, ect. the less there is to mess up (K.I.S.S.), IMO the better off you are.
 
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