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Hi, might be a stupid question and I think I know the answer but I recently bought a Yamaha AS-201 integrated amplifier to power a pair of Jamo D266s, the amp provides 100w RMS per channel but can have up to 4 speakers connected to it. My question is, is that 100w RMS per channel lessened if I run four speakers at once, i.e is there any point adding more speakers to the system, or is this more of a multi room option? Cheers
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by byronr93  /t/1523265/advice-on-amp#post_24502028


Hi, might be a stupid question and I think I know the answer but I recently bought a Yamaha AS-201 integrated amplifier to power a pair of Jamo D266s, the amp provides 100w RMS per channel but can have up to 4 speakers connected to it. My question is, is that 100w RMS per channel lessened if I run four speakers at once, i.e is there any point adding more speakers to the system, or is this more of a multi room option? Cheers

The power delivered by the amp is probably increased when you run all 4 speakers, but the power per speaker decreases. Usually this decrease is on the order of a few dB, and only apparent at peak listening levels. The amp might run a bit warmer at high volumes.
 

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Thank you for the reply, so all in all if I were to get hold of a pair of the same or similar speakers there would be use to this?


I never run the amp at peak volume any how, it's just too loud. Plus I've noticed clipping on certain tracks before, am I right in thinking this is the amp being pushed to its limits rather than the speakers? Cheers
 

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If by "clipping" you mean distortion, then there is no way of knowing if the issue is the speaker or the amplifier (or both), as either one will distort when pushed to its limits.  If you had a more powerful amplifier, you could hook the speakers up to it and see if you get the same distortion at the same volume.  If you did, it would mean that it is the speakers, and if you did not, it would mean that it is the amplifier that you are currently using.  (A better way would be using sophisticated test equipment, but if you had that, you would not be asking us about this.)

 

If you need higher volume, you probably will want to replace the speakers with something that has a higher sensitivity, preferably conjoined with reasonably high power handling.  Of course, you might want to do some online searching about noise-related hearing loss first, as high volumes can do permanent damage to your hearing.

 

Now, I do not know what your speakers can handle, but as it takes a doubling of power to get just 3dB higher volume (which is easily noticeable, but not a dramatic difference), it would take a lot more power to get much more volume, even if your speakers can take it.  So this is why it is usually a good idea to look for high sensitivity speakers instead (because they play louder per watt than lower sensitivity speakers).

 

 

If you use a second pair of speakers, this is primarily for having sound in more than one place.  It generally is considered to degrade the sound if you run two pairs of speakers on a 2 channel stereo amplifier in the same room, though some people like it.  The reason it is considered to degrade the sound is because the sound from one is likely to be out of phase with the other (from the listening position), and so you will likely have some cancelations which will cause dips in the frequency response, as well as other such issues regarding the interaction of the sound from the two sets of speakers.

 

Also, you effectively reduce the impedance presented to the amplifier in most cases, as most of the time, the two sets of speakers are wired in parallel.  If the speakers are identical, it will effectively halve the impedance that the amplifier deals with.  In some cases, this can be a problem if the impedance is too low for the amplifier to handle.  Normally, this is discussed in the manual, as well as there often being a warning printed on the back of the amplifier next to the speaker terminals.
 
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