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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally made my way through the first stack of DVD disks (Memorex 16x DVD-r) and it's time to reorder. I have purchased a DVD burner for the computer (reads and writes in all formats).


Questions:


Should I use different DVD disks for the ES-20 and computer burner?


I found a source on line that has great prices on Taiyo Yuden 8x DVD-r disks ($28.99 for 100 disks value line or 35.99 for 100 disks premium line). Is there a substantial improvement with the premium line over the value line? Any problems with Taiyo Yuden and Panasonic ES-20?


Most of my disks will be burned on the ES-20. Is it advantageous to purchase 16x disks for the computer DVD burner?


Other disk suggestions?


Thanks!

Rick


DVD neophyte
 

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I have less than 200 of the Taiyo Yuden Value Line discs left out of 600 I bought last year. In the first 300 I only got one bad burn, but then I got two plus one with an obvious defect I detected visually before using it. My last order was from SuperMediaStore.com for 200 of the Premium Line, $58 delivered. Anything under $30/disc is a good price in my opinion. I haven't tried the Premium Line yet. But I do recommend Taiyo Yuden discs, for quality and price. Doubtful comeone can point to a better quality disc (okay maybe the $4/disc Mobile Fidelity Gold discs: http://www.elusivedisc.com/prodinfo.asp?number=MOBDVR25 ).


Regarding burn speed I now burn (on PC) at 4x despite having a perfectly fine 16x burner and media (NEC 3540). I once did an admittedly informal test using 4x, 8x, and 16x burn speeds to the same kind of disc and saw better ECC results on the 4x burn. It's by no means a conclusive result, but I'm sticking to 4x anyway. "Your mileage may vary."
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply, Bob!


Supermedia was the source of my price quotes on TY media. I have been debating on whether to buy 100 or 200 disks. They still have a deal for 200 premium line 8x TY disks for $58 that also includes paper sleeves. I'll probably buy the 200 pack.


How do you organize and store all of your disks?


Do you use the paper sleeves, jewel cases, store on spindle or some other method?


How do you identify titles on the disks?


Thanks for the info on burn speed. My dvd burner has been ordered but not yet received from new egg.


What's your thoughts on RAM media (I have a panasonic es20)?


I love to watch hockey and would like to record goals. I was thinking that I could use a RAM disk to record the goals, load on my computer, and then burn to a DVD-r. Should work fine, correct?


Thanks for your great advice!



Rick
 

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My achival discs (infrequently accessed) are stored in 50-disc cake boxes. I have a couple of Tupperware-like sotrage bins, each holding 12 such cake boxes, about 3/4 full.


More frequently-accessed stuff resides in 2-disc and 4-disc jewel cases from CompUSA, allowing me to achieve 4x the density of using full-width CD jewel cases. I only have a hunderd or so of these discs so they easily fit on a shelf or two of my rotating media storage units: http://www.avthinginitsplace.com/Mer...OD/RR/BMS-1060


Not sure what you mean by "identify titles", I just write on the discs with a felt-tip marker.


I don't use DVD-RAM since getting HDD-capable recorders. Using DVD-RAM to transfer to PC has the problem that fewer DVD-RAM capable drives exist, and fewer applications understand the DVD-RAM file structure. DVD-R/W is what I use for that.
 

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I use a printer to print on mine (and have even made some "fancy" home movie discs). I store mine in a 500 disc binder and since I can print with photos, flipping and identifying the discs is very easy.


Since my old Panny DMR-E80H won't handle -RW media, I use DVD-RAM to transfer to my PC and edit lossless (cuts, etc) with MPEG Video Wizard. My 5 year old LG DVD-ROM drive and the program handle the DVD-RAM burned by the Panny with no problems.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart /forum/post/0


My achival discs (infrequently accessed) are stored in 50-disc cake boxes. I have a couple of Tupperware-like sotrage bins, each holding 12 such cake boxes, about 3/4 full.

Is it safe to store burnt DVDs in a cakebox compared to jewel cases or paper-sleeves? (as far as affecting the longevity of the recording)? Or it doesn't make a significant difference?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IDRick /forum/post/0


Most of my disks will be burned on the ES-20. Is it advantageous to purchase 16x disks for the computer DVD burner?


Other disk suggestions?

Just about everything I tried on the ES20 was fine. There were two exceptions: Phillips DVD+R and the new Staples golden/green cover made-in-India DVD-R (previous Staples blanks were fine).


I use 8x/16x on the ES20 interchangeably without any issues.


The ones I used off the top of my head:

DVD-R: Sony, Maxell, Office Depot (75pk + 25pk CD-R), Verbatim, TDK

In the past also used DVD-R: HP, Office Max, Fuji, Staples (other than new golden/green), Playo (only if bargain priced)

DVD-RW: Sony (2x) and Office Depot (4x)

DVD-RAM: Panasonic
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncaahoops /forum/post/0


Is it safe to store burnt DVDs in a cakebox compared to jewel cases or paper-sleeves? (as far as affecting the longevity of the recording)? Or it doesn't make a significant difference?

Everything I've read recommends storing DVDs vertically. Probably has to do with maintaining their shape/flatness...no droopy edges?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wabjxo /forum/post/0


Everything I've read recommends storing DVDs vertically. Probably has to do with maintaining their shape/flatness...no droopy edges?

That along with the bending the disc takes each and every time you remove it from the case can't be good.
 

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Here's a good summary of dos and don'ts published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)... the people who've tested DVDs for longevity, etc.


"Do:

1. Handle discs by the outer edge or the center hole.

2. Use a non solvent-based felt-tip permanent marker to mark the label side of the disc.

3. Keep dirt or other foreign matter from the disc.

4. Store discs upright (book style) in plastic cases specified for CDs and DVDs.

5. Return discs to storage cases immediately after use.

6. Leave discs in their packaging (or cases) to minimize the effects of environmental changes.

7. Open a recordable disc package only when you are ready to record data on that disc.

8. Store in a cool, dry, dark environment in which the air is clean.

9. Remove dirt, foreign material, fingerprints, smudges, and liquids by wiping with a clean cotton fabric in a straight line from the center of the disc toward the outer edge.

10. Use CD/DVD cleaning detergent, isopropyl alcohol or methanol to remove stubborn dirt or material.

11. Check the disc surface before recording.


Do not:

1. Touch the surface of the disc.

2. Bend the disc

3. Use adhesive labels.

4. Store discs horizontally for a long time (years).

5. Open a recordable optical disc package if you are not ready to record.

6. Expose discs to extreme heat or high humidity.

7. Expose discs to extreme rapid temperature or humidity changes.

8. Expose recordable discs to prolonged sunlight or other sources of UV light.

9. Write or mark in the data area of the disc (area where the laser "reads").

10. Clean in a circular direction around the disc."


These all apply to both CDs and DVDs, but for #4 of the "Dos" another org recommends NOT using CDs cases to store DVDs...can cause stress at the center hole.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sivartk /forum/post/0


That along with the bending the disc takes each and every time you remove it from the case can't be good.

Yeah, some of the cases make it almost impossible to take out the disc without bending it or fighting with the case :), but most of the slim-jewel cases I have just pop the disc up, I don't notice any bending...


As far as storing discs vertically, what method(s) are recommended?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
BobK, thanks for the web address on storages! Right now I only have a spindle (sorted alphabetically) for storing DVD's. The cases that store 4 DVd's are intriguing, I'll check them out on Compusa's site.


Sivartk, thanks for the heads up on MPEG video wizard. My first computer DVD burner will be arriving this week. I knew I needed authoring software, your tip is very helpful. I have 5 RAM disks and there are times that I must burn directly to DVD before removing commercials (don't have time for "real time" editing. This program will come in very handy! :) BTW, I found your comment on printing DVD's very interesting. Could you send me an example or post one to the list? What software do you use to develop the covers?


Sivartk, I've looked at the large DVD wallets at walmart. A good relatively inexpensive method for storing lots of disks. I was concerned about potential scratches on the DVD. Has this been an issue for you (scratches on the printed cover or saved video portion)?


Ncaahoops, thanks for the list of media! Very helpful to know which media has worked well with the es-20! Which do you prefer for rewritable media, RAM or -RW?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wabjxo /forum/post/0


Here's a good summary of dos and don'ts published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)... the people who've tested DVDs for longevity, etc.


"Do:

1. Handle discs by the outer edge or the center hole.

2. Use a non solvent-based felt-tip permanent marker to mark the label side of the disc.

3. Keep dirt or other foreign matter from the disc.

4. Store discs upright (book style) in plastic cases specified for CDs and DVDs.

5. Return discs to storage cases immediately after use.

6. Leave discs in their packaging (or cases) to minimize the effects of environmental changes.

7. Open a recordable disc package only when you are ready to record data on that disc.

8. Store in a cool, dry, dark environment in which the air is clean.

9. Remove dirt, foreign material, fingerprints, smudges, and liquids by wiping with a clean cotton fabric in a straight line from the center of the disc toward the outer edge.

10. Use CD/DVD cleaning detergent, isopropyl alcohol or methanol to remove stubborn dirt or material.

11. Check the disc surface before recording.


Do not:

1. Touch the surface of the disc.

2. Bend the disc

3. Use adhesive labels.

4. Store discs horizontally for a long time (years).

5. Open a recordable optical disc package if you are not ready to record.

6. Expose discs to extreme heat or high humidity.

7. Expose discs to extreme rapid temperature or humidity changes.

8. Expose recordable discs to prolonged sunlight or other sources of UV light.

9. Write or mark in the data area of the disc (area where the laser "reads").

10. Clean in a circular direction around the disc."


These all apply to both CDs and DVDs, but for #4 of the "Dos" another org recommends NOT using CDs cases to store DVDs...can cause stress at the center hole.

Thanks!
 

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Regarding horizontal versus vertical storage of discs, I have seen some warnings against storing them horizontally. Yet they are sold "stored" horizontally in cake boxes. I guess they are concerned with slight bending downward due to gravity, at the edges relative to the center. So far no problems with my horizontally-stored discs. I guess if I want to be really sure I could arrange to have them be on their sides in the cakeboxes. Somehow.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IDRick /forum/post/0


Ncaahoops, thanks for the list of media! Very helpful to know which media has worked well with the es-20! Which do you prefer for rewritable media, RAM or -RW?

-RAM has more features on Panasonics, but -RW is about 3x cheaper on sale, so I mostly use -RW; unless I am recording something that needs the extra features of DVD-RAMs on Panasonics (I also have a Panasonic dvd player so I can play without finalizing as opposed to -RW/-R on Panasonic).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart /forum/post/0


Regarding horizontal versus vertical storage of discs, I have seen some warnings against storing them horizontally. Yet they are sold "stored" horizontally in cake boxes. I guess they are concerned with slight bending downward due to gravity, at the edges relative to the center. So far no problems with my horizontally-stored discs. I guess if I want to be really sure I could arrange to have them be on their sides in the cakeboxes. Somehow.

That is a very good point, and TDK is now selling them in a 10-pack hybrid spindle/jewel-case intended for storing before and after.


Could there be a difference between blank and burned media when it comes to horizontal storing?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncaahoops /forum/post/0


That is a very good point, and TDK is now selling them in a 10-pack hybrid spindle/jewel-case intended for storing before and after.


Could there be a difference between blank and burned media when it comes to horizontal storing?

Blank media is supposed to have a 5-year shelf life and they assume you'll be burning them before that time, so they won't be on the spindle for 30 years or more like burned, archived DVDs?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncaahoops /forum/post/0


Could there be a difference between blank and burned media when it comes to horizontal storing?

It sure doesn't seem like it. If we knew the exact reason why they warn against horizontal storage, that would help answer that one. But if it's the reason I suspect, then no. Gravity doesn't care if the disc is burned or not and will warp it either way. To me it seems like such warpage would take decades, if at all, discs are light and stiff. Not much force pulling at the outer edge of a disc. But who knows. Perhaps inverting the cake boxes every year to balance out the bending . . . ?
 

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These all apply to both CDs and DVDs, but for #4 of the "Dos" another org recommends NOT using CDs cases to store DVDs...can cause stress at the center hole.


I am going to offer an uninformed, unscientific, and perhaps even ignorant opinion:


If DVD Discs are so fragile that the "stress" that occurs from the negligable weight of a disc "hanging" on a center hub of a CD Case can damage them, or anything recorded on them, then DVD is an utterly failed technology and unworthy of being called anything other than short-term temporary storage!


I do not, however, believe either to be the case. ; )
 
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