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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are building a new two-story house. Framing is done but dry wall is not yet done. The next step is to wire all the rooms on both floors with Cat 6 cable. From what I have read in the forum, the use of conduit is recommended. However, when I brought it up to our general contractor he told us that conduit is only done in a commercial unit but not in a residential unit because of the multiple turns and corners in the house. Is he pulling my legs and should I insist on him using conduits?
 

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I dont see the need for conduit...
 

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We are building a new two-story house. Framing is done but dry wall is not yet done. The next step is to wire all the rooms on both floors with Cat 6 cable. From what I have read in the forum, the use of conduit is recommended. However, when I brought it up to our general contractor he told us that conduit is only done in a commercial unit but not in a residential unit because of the multiple turns and corners in the house. Is he pulling my legs and should I insist on him using conduits?
When we talk about "conduit" here for low-volt wiring, we're talking about flexible conduit (not the rigid metal conduit used for commerical and/or Chicago-based construction).

The flex conduit runs are done to key locations or areas that will be inaccessible after drywall (rooms without an unfinished basement or attic below/above). That, and for future-proofing. The flex conduit (aka Smurf tube) is left empty so that you can add more cables in the future - especially those that haven't been invented yet.

See lots of threads in the "Home AV Distribution" forum a few down from here...

Jeff
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When we talk about "conduit" here for low-volt wiring, we're talking about flexible conduit (not the rigid metal conduit used for commerical and/or Chicago-based construction).

The flex conduit runs are done to key locations or areas that will be inaccessible after drywall (rooms without an unfinished basement or attic below/above). That, and for future-proofing. The flex conduit (aka Smurf tube) is left empty so that you can add more cables in the future - especially those that haven't been invented yet.

See lots of threads in the "Home AV Distribution" forum a few down from here...

Jeff
Thanks you two.
 
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