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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A newbie here. I currently have a Sony HTiB that I bought just to use it as an HDMI switch and also support Multichannel LPCM for my HTPC and PS3.


I'm planning to upgrade my system, but I'm not rich like you guys, so the idea is to upgrade the speakers first and use the amplifier until I can buy a new one.


First, I would like to buy the center and/or the fronts, I'm learning toward the Energy minis, Polk RTiA3s, SVS SBS01 or even JBL ES80, but that's different matter.


The amplifier specifications:


Stereo: 84 W + 84 W (3 omhs at 170-20,000 Hz, THD 1%)


Surround mode: RMS Output (3 omhs at 1 Khz, THD 10%). Front: 143 W/ch, center: 143 W/ch

Surround: 143 W/ch (1.5 omhs at 80 Hz, THD 10%)


From what I've learned there's no danger to damage the amplifier if I use an 8 omhs speaker, but:


Question 1: Can the amplifier damage the speakers?


I know that I'm no gonna get full quality sound using the current amplifier, but:


Question 2: will there be any improvement/sound with the new speakers?


Thanks for your help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Denophile,


Some speakers have specifications of 8 omhs, but also a 4 omhs as minimum impedance. My amplifier has a rating of 3 omhs, I understand this is just an average and the impedance is variable, but does this has any effect on the speaker?


Thanks again.
 

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I'd suggest that if you're going to upgrade your speakers and still use the HTIB receiver section, I'd look at speakers that are as sensitive as possible, within reason. Also, I question the power/frequency response spec. If it's 170 Hz-20 kHz as you state, I assume that's because of the subwoofer taking over below that relatively high LF rolloff.


If your receiver can drive a 3 ohm speaker, you can look for a speaker that doesn't dip below 4 ohms. Your receiver will probably put out more power into 4 ohms than into 8 ohms. And an 8 ohm speaker won't sound any different than a 4 ohm speaker, all other things being equal, as long as the amplifier is not put beyond it's performance parameters.


Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Paul,


When you say: "look at speakers that are as sensitive as possible, within reason", what should I look for?. For example the energy RC-mini center has a Frequency Response 78Hz-23000Hz (+/- 3dB) and a Sensitivity (anechoic) of 91dB. Is this speaker sensitive enough?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/16972176


Also, I question the power/frequency response spec. If it's 170 Hz-20 kHz as you state, I assume that's because of the subwoofer taking over below that relatively high LF rolloff.

Those specifications are for the front left and right channels only, unfortunately there's no specification for the subwofer "channel" in the manual. You are probably right with this assumption.


Thanks again
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm almost done, thanks for the answers, but I need a response, then I can buy the speakers:


"look at speakers that are as sensitive as possible, within reason"


What should I look for?. For example the energy RC-mini center has a Frequency Response 78Hz-23000Hz (+/- 3dB) and a Sensitivity (anechoic) of 91dB. Is this speaker sensitive enough?


Sorry to bump
 

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Sorry this answer is three months late. The amplifier technology today provides an output voltage which is unaffected by speaker impedance. This means that the power output will change when using a speaker having a nominal impedance different from the design impedance of the amplifier. There should not be any damage caused by connecting another speaker. Most amplifiers today are designed for 3 or 4 ohm speakers. This allows a higher power output at lower power supply voltage which better matches the properties of the solid state ICs used. The power is reduced by 50% when the impedance doubles, I.E going from 4 to 8 ohms. The maximum power specified for the amplifier is also reduced in half. This means that distortion will occur at half the power. Half power is -3dB so the sound output level is reduced by 3dB for speakers having the same sensitivity but twice the impedance. If you replace one 4 ohm speaker with two 8 ohm speakers connected in parallel the power from the pair will be the same as the from the 4 ohm speaker. The speakers must be connected with matching phase, + to + and - to -.
 
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