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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok... If you are like me you've had enough of trying to work thru this scenario and have read far too many threads about such, but...


and I almost hate to bring it up again...


Can anyone provide any solid intelligence/personal experience with this very tired question: 4:3 vs 16:9 for a Native 4:3 projector?


I am about to plunk down for a NEC HT1000 projector and am shopping for an appropriate screen. I do realize that much of screen choice is based on "personal" viewing preferences, etc. - my viewing habits unfortunately "cross" - I will absolutely be watching a LOT of native 16:9 (dvd, hdtv) but am also a NUT for a good classic movie, IMAX (4:3).


I have about 80" of ceiling height to work with, 106" wide, viewing distance just under 10', ambient light not an issue...


ANY thoughts (again!) on this would be VERY MUCH appreciated... just when I think I have come to a semblance of a decision I start countering my own arguments....
 

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16:9 is the future.



There are classic movies in IMAX? Look there's movies made in 1.85, 2.0 2.35, 2.4 etc etc there are plenty of aspect ratios Get the 16:9 its cooler and most equipment will accomodate it now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Tryg
16:9 is the future.



There are classic movies in IMAX? Look there's movies made in 1.85, 2.0 2.35, 2.4 etc etc there are plenty of aspect ratios Get the 16:9 its cooler and most equipment will accomodate it now.
I had understood IMAX presentations to be in 4:3 format; I could be mistaken.


Thanks for your response; what I DON'T want to have happen is being in situation where I have to "stretch" a 4:3 to fit a 16:9 (wherein Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca looks several pounds heavier than she deservedly ought to!).
 

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I think you are confused.

You never stretch anything unless you would then unstretch it with an anamorphic lens.


you can use this method with a 4:3 projector but most dont.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Tryg
I think you are confused.

You never stretch anything unless you would then unstretch it with an anamorphic lens.


you can use this method with a 4:3 projector but most dont.


Per article: Your Biggest Decision: 4:3 or 16:9?

Evan Powell, August 8, 2003

ProjectorCentral.com



"you can use the "stretch" feature on the projector to distort the 4:3 image horizontally so it fills the 16:9 frame"... "To anyone serious about seeing a video or film the way the creator intended it, this tasteless distortion of the 4:3 image (a "featured option" of all 16:9 video display devices) will be unacceptable."


I think you are correct/solid in that, what with practically everything in non 4:3 these days (and forthcoming), 16:9 may make the most sense practically. Thanks for the discourse; it is appreciated!
 
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