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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm using Aimer DVD ripper on a mac and I'm not happy with the quality I'm getting regardless of settings and file type. With everything other then mpeg 4 there's a good deal of stutter in pans and any scene with a lot of movement. The problem though with the mpeg 4s is they have a lot more obvious compression then other settings. With all settings there seems to be a lot of tearing with movement due to interlace issues that aren't there nearly as obviously as playing the DVD itself. When I set it to deinterlace then there's more obvious aliasing (steppy blocks on diagonals).


What is the best settings to eliminate these problems or is this simply an unavoidable issue when ripping a DVD?


thanks
 

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Ripping a DVD and re-encoding a dvd to mp4 are two completely different tasks. Ripping a DVD preserves 100% of the quality of the original DVD as it does not encode the content into another format (ala, mp4). Re-encoding a DVD usually entails ripping the DVD and then re-encoding the DVD with a lossy codec (ala, mp4). If you want to rip a DVD I'd recommend either Mac The Ripper or RipIt. If you want to rip and re-encode your DVD's, then I would suggest Handbrake or Turbo.h264. Neither Handbrake or Turbo.h264 will preserve 100% of the quality of the original DVD, but they're both fairly good and should be better than what you're using now if you're experiencing tearing and stutters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew67 /forum/post/16909796


Ripping a DVD and re-encoding a dvd to mp4 are two completely different tasks. Ripping a DVD preserves 100% of the quality of the original DVD as it does not encode the content into another format (ala, mp4). Re-encoding a DVD usually entails ripping the DVD and then re-encoding the DVD with a lossy codec (ala, mp4). If you want to rip a DVD I'd recommend either Mac The Ripper or RipIt. If you want to rip and re-encode your DVD's, then I would suggest Handbrake or Turbo.h264. Neither Handbrake or Turbo.h264 will preserve 100% of the quality of the original DVD, but they're both fairly good and should be better than what you're using now if you're experiencing tearing and stutters.

Thanks Andrew...that's very helpful. I've used both Mac the Ripper and Handbrake. I love Handbrake but it is extremely slow compared to the aimer software. I can rip...sorry re-encode about two hour of DVD VOBs in about 20 minutes to any of the mpeg formats or mpeg2 VOBs. I'm not sure if you know the software or not but because of the speed in comparison to Handbrake I just assumed it was the other way around....that is that Handbrake was re-encoding and the Aimer software was simply pulling the files from the disc.


Here's another odd thing. There seems to be a lot more tearing when using the Aimer software with something like a vintage TV show then with a modern movie, even though that tearing is not obvious on either the TV show or the movie. I'm guessing it has something to do with the original masters in the case of the TV show being interlaced video while the scan of the film would be progressive. Curious of your thoughts on that.


As to Mac the Ripper I used it a couple of times but it seems to make a mess of the order of things. Copying some files multiple times and missing parts of others. I haven't given it enough of a chance perhaps. Thanks for the heads up with Ripit...i'll check it out


cheers and thanks
 

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I glanced at Aimer DVD stuff earlier. As it's a port of a windows app, I didn't look too long. If it can rip a DVD without re-encoding to another format, the video quality should be fine. At a glance, it looked like it would always re-encode the video to something. The reason it's much faster than Handbrake is that quality is not it's focus. Unless you have some kind of hardware assistance, you usually end up making a choice for speed or quality. The Turbo.h264 USB encoding stick will give all the speed you need and most of the quality. Handbrake beats it quality wise, but at 8x the encoding time.


You may also want to check out MakeMKV. It will rip a dvd and create a single mkv file. No re-encoding, 100% of the original dvd quality. You can select which subtitles, audio tracks, and extras you want to rip. It's free as far as I know.
 
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