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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read posts about spraying or rolling 2-3 ultra-thin coats of paints to maintain transparency, but these descriptions sound like the diy'er ready to attempt this technique is S.O.L. if it isn't 110% perfect.


Has anyone tried a self-leveling laquer or varnish that, when mixed with silvery or pearly or colored paint, allows for a sloppy application that will have everything evenly distributed and won't allow roller/brush marks? This could also be one coat, as well.


Imagine:

Get (or make) yourself a big mirror. Mix up some of that laquer with some Mmud. Slop it on. Let the surface flatten itself out and dry. Enjoy*.


No worrying about the right pressure on your sprayer, worrying if you got enough on that spot, but not too much, but if not enough did it dry too much in these past 15 seconds to work with, did i press too hard with the roller, not hard enough, etc.



(* In DIY parlance that means, tweak it, repaint it, rebuild it, take a picture, tweak it some more, repaint, watch half of a movie, take another picture, re-tweak....)
 

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Hey neighbor, I'm in Oconomowoc. I know what you mean, but you can't get a nice finish with just 1 coat of paint(no matter what you're painting). When I painted my MDF screen, I mixed Floetrol with my paint and it worked very well. It slows drying time and eliminates roller/brush marks. I primed with Kilz 2, then 2 coats of paint.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc G
I've read posts about spraying or rolling 2-3 ultra-thin coats of paints to maintain transparency, but these descriptions sound like the diy'er ready to attempt this technique is S.O.L. if it isn't 110% perfect.


Has anyone tried a self-leveling laquer or varnish that, when mixed with silvery or pearly or colored paint, allows for a sloppy application that will have everything evenly distributed and won't allow roller/brush marks? This could also be one coat, as well.


Imagine:

Get (or make) yourself a big mirror. Mix up some of that laquer with some Mmud. Slop it on. Let the surface flatten itself out and dry. Enjoy*.


No worrying about the right pressure on your sprayer, worrying if you got enough on that spot, but not too much, but if not enough did it dry too much in these past 15 seconds to work with, did i press too hard with the roller, not hard enough, etc.




(* In DIY parlance that means, tweak it, repaint it, rebuild it, take a picture, tweak it some more, repaint, watch half of a movie, take another picture, re-tweak....)
Behr Ultra Pure White flat. Or Behr Silver Screen I guess. An idiot can put this on. I know because I have done it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
AC,

Those paints are too opaque to offer transparency except in very thin coats, which is kind of the whole thing that I'm looking to avoid.


Jim,

Floetrol kind of fits the bill of what I was thinking. Does that reduce brush marks by thinning the medium so that peaks are too weak to stand?


I was thinking of something so thick that the peaks are too heavy to stand. Think: a big piece of melted clear plastic. Perfectly flat surface texture, any particles we add perfectly distributed in both area and concentration.


There are clear laquers that exist that would do this but the ones that I know of are not colorless. I guess I just need to do some searching and some experimenting.


-Marc
 

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Floetrol is not a thinner. It reduces or eliminates brush/roller marks by slowing down the drying time, giving the paint more time to level out. The latex paints dry so damn fast they're hard to work with.
 
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