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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
today, satellite install guy tells me i'm not getting true hd with my dish6000 hooked up to my sony 61hs10 because i've hooked up without rbg(?)from back of dish, do i need to buy rgb-rbkyb(whatever those hookups are)connector to see true hd? he says because i dont have horiz an vert hookedup im missing out. TRUE OR FALSE? whats a new hd junkie gotta do to get his fix?

ps if this is hooked up wrong, cant wait to see it right!
 

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the HS10 can accept either RGB (5 plug) or component (Y-Pr-Pb 3 plug) signal.


Depending on what your 6000 has for outputs, he could be right, or he could be wrong. If it only output 5-jack RGB, then I don't know what would happen. If it outputs component, you should be golden the way you have it set up.


dinesh



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DVI/HDCP sucks. DFAST sucks. Boycott JVC.
 

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Yes, you are a moron. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


You need to have the RGB or component outputs hooked up to your HDTV. You should not need to buy such a cable since it should have come with the 6023 system (assuming that is what you got). Hook the the component video cable from the component video output on your Dish 6000 to the component input on your Sony.
 

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To get true HDTV you must either use the VGA or YpBpR outputs. Feding the monitor with composite video (the yellow audio type plug) or using Svideo (the litthe 4 pin plug) is not HDTV.


I am not familiar with your Sony TV. If it has "component" inputs, then you need three video cables between the TV and the 6000. They don't have to be red blue and green cables, three 6 foot video cables from radio Shack will work fine. Just make sure yoy connect green to green, red to red, etc.


If the TV has 1 mini 15pin connector like a computer monitor, then you need a VGA cable from a computer store. I think the 6000 will output either RGBHV or Component, so depending on waht your TV has, you should only need a cable(s).


Now to get HDTV you will need a second dish pointed at 61.5 (east coast) or 148 (west coast) to get the true HDTV channels. They are HBO, Showtime, and a PPV Dish channel.


Even though the 6000 may convert standard definition up to HDTV, it's not true HDTV and in many cases looks worse than the composite video connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
opps let me say that dish6000 is hooked up with ypbpr to same on sony, audio is digital optical, dude is telling me if rgb is not hooked up i dont have true hd.
 

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There is one easy way of telling on the Dish receiver. * THe Blue Light *

If you can see an image when you press the HD/SD button on the remote, and the blue light on the receiver is on, you got HD. (The 6000 only outputs to one set of outputs, you are either HD or SD, never both).


Don't feel bad if you are not wired correctly. The morons that delivered and set up my RP HDTV did not hook up the component cables, and gave my wife some screwy story about what it took to get HDTV. THe 6000 comes with component cables, which are a bundle of three RCA to RCA coaxial cables. The back of the E* 6000 has a D connector for RGBHV and three color coded RCA jacks labled component. Both are HDTV signals. To use the component outputs, match the color on the cable to the color on the receiver jack. There should be similar connectors on the monitor. Do the same.

Hit the HD/SD button on the remote. WaaaLaaaa


SM
 

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The install guy is the moron (or more accurately, he is mistaken on this one point; he may be a genius in other areas). Your hookup is fine.


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You have a right to install OTA and dish antennas on property under your control.


See http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 

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Glimmie and BarryO are correct. The "Blue Light" response from Swampfox is correct in that it signifies a true HD transmission. However, it can be misleading in that it does not guarentee that the original source material is a proper HD conversion - theoretically it may only be an "upconverted" I Love Lucy rerun for example.


[This message has been edited by Ray H (edited 04-18-2001).]
 

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Your installers knowledge level should limit his verbal output. Your DTV input (usually video5) can be configured from the main menu with a progressive or HD source feeding the television. It allows you to choose from component (YPbPr) or RGBHV. According to the manual on the 53HS10 I installed recently it is 480i, 480p, 1080i compatible on that input. It does not appear compatible with the 720p output format.


Good luck with all.


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STOP HDCP on DVI

Don O


[This message has been edited by Don O'Brien (edited 04-18-2001).]
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Ray H:

Glimmie and BarryO are correct. The "Blue Light" response from Swampfox is correct in that it signifies a true HD transmission.

That's not correct, unless you're referring to the signal between the 6000 and the TV as a "transmission". The blue light comes on when the 6000's HD outputs are in use. It could be upconverting an analog NTSC OTA signal and still be outputting an HD signal, and the blue light would be on.


If the blue light is on, and you're seeing a picture, it means your HD component(or RGB) connections are hooked up properly, and your TV is capable of displaying an HD signal from the 6000. That's what Swampfox wrote, and he's correct.


In the current version of the software, there are no aspect ratio controls if receiving an HD signal. The aspect ratio controls are only active when the receiver is upconverting 480i to HD. So, if you're in HD mode, one way to tell whether you're receiving an HD broadcast (which itself may have been upconverted), or upconverting in the receiver, is to try the aspect ratio controls. If nothing happens, you're receiving an HD broadcast (upconverted or native). If the picture changes when you switch modes, your receiver is doing the upconverting, so you must be receiving 480i.


-Jonathan
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by jhue:
If the blue light is on, and you're seeing a picture, it means your HD component(or RGB) connections are hooked up properly, and your TV is capable of displaying an HD signal from the 6000. That's what Swampfox wrote, and he's correct.
I re-read the fox's post, and I believe you're (and him) right. My confusion about his meaning stemmed from something else he prefaced his explanation with: "If you can see an image when you press the HD/SD button on the remote, and the blue light on the receiver is on, you got HD.", and I took that one sentence as passing judgment that the illumination of the blue light signified that the souce material was a proper HD transfer. Sorry about the confusion, Swampfox, and thanks for the heads-up, jhue.

 
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