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I got the 5th element Superbit. I was very very pleased. Last night we watched some of the Phantom menace. My Sony 7000 (probably like a great many machines out there) has a 'bit rate' meter. So I turned it on, just to see.


The box on T5E says it's ~7Mbs (sp??) and a normal disc is around 3.5. I didn't bother checking what my player read it at, I assumed it would be ~7 as stated. When we watched TPM, a lot of it was ~7 also.


So, are lots of other studio's discs already at or near the "superbit" levels, is it just this Star Wars disc, or is there something else that I'm missing?


I'm not at all displeased with the 5th element, in fact I think it's great. I'm just wondering about the hype.


Thank you all in advance for your thoughts.
 

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From what I have read about the new "Superbits", the bit rate is only PART of the improvement. Some existing discs average anywhere from 3.5 to 10. In addition, the video quality largely depends on the MPEG encoder and the way it was implemented. Again, I am unable to get technical so I won't be able to provide a precise answer. However, judging from what I've been reading the marketing of a higher bit rate is very misleading as it really is not the sole reason why there is an increase in performance.

Try visiting the Widescreen Review site and do a search on this forum as well as the HTF. I'm confident that there are better explanations out there.


Elbert
 

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I just want to know where they got this mythological 3.5Mbit/sec number from. It's complete BS. Run a good bitrate analysis using a computer of any DVD released today on a dual layer disc and unless the disc is packed with 3 hours of extras you won't get anywhere close to 3.5 average. For a single layer disc the equivalent would be an hour and a half (given an average runtime of 100 minutes for the movie itself).


For movies that were originally released on single sided, single layer discs there is of course an increase in bitrate - together with the improvement of the MPEG encoding software/hardware in general.


Just as an FYI - single sided single layer discs can hold 63 minutes at maximum bitrate. Single sided dual layer discs can hold 115 minutes at maximum bitrate. So if you put a movie that is 126 minutes long on a single layer disc the average bitrate is half that of maximum - and that's 5Mbit/sec. Put it on a dual layer disc however and you'll barely have to reduce the bitrate to get it to fit. Average bitrate is then in the 9-10 range.


The problem with many releases (like the R2/4 TPM for instance) is that they don't optimize the encoding to fully utilize the available space on the DVD and so there may be some bitrate wastage. I've seen many discs whith 1-3GB of unused space that could have benefitted the picture quality in the form of higher bitrate. I haven't gotten any of the superbit releases yet so I'm very curious about how good they are in this regard.


Oh yes - one more thing. Bitrate meters on standalone players are IMO useless for telling you something about the average bitrate of the movie. Their only use is for checking whether an artifact is caused by too low bitrate - or is caused by something else.
 

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Quote:
Oh yes - one more thing. Bitrate meters on standalone players are IMO useless for telling you something about the


Why are they useless? They must convey some info as I can see large differences with different DVDs and the ones with a high bitrate according to my player seem to be the better transfers.
 

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On my Toshiba SD-5109 there is a display meter that shows at the bottom of the screen with numbers that change constantly.

Are these numbers what you are reffering to?

I was'nt sure of the accuracy of the meter since it is constantly changing.
 

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My disc changers both have a bit rate, I never in the years of owning understood them. The only extra I ever viewed was what M. Night Shamylan painted red in the movie "The Sixth Sense" meant death. The only other extra in featurette was the "Dirty Dancing in Concert" from the disc "Dirty Dancing".


Most of the discs have all those features

to which I've never known how to change the angle or just what the bit rate meter was for. It must be a pneumonia hangover, I read all your posts and I still don't know, what your all talking about. Should I take a aspirin go to sleep, and ask you all in the morning? :)
 

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Quote:
Just as an FYI - single sided single layer discs can hold 63 minutes at maximum bitrate. Single sided dual layer discs can hold 115 minutes at maximum bitrate. So if you put a movie that is 126 minutes long on a single layer disc the average bitrate is half that of maximum - and that's 5Mbit/sec. Put it on a dual layer disc however and you'll barely have to reduce the bitrate to get it to fit. Average bitrate is then in the 9-10 range.
However, as you already know that is assuming no extras features or audio tracks etc.


That said, I'd really prefer if they stop using DD 2.0 even though it does save space. Use PCM stereo. Or even if DD 2.0 is going to be used I wish they'd do it properly. Too much DD 2.0 sounds like crap.
 
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