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I just seen this on CNN.

The music or voice from the audio source is converted to a highly complex ultrasonic signal by the signal processor before being amplified and emitted into the air by the transducer (emitter). Since the ultrasonic energy is highly directional, it forms a virtual column of sound directly in front of the emitter, much like the light from a flashlight. All along that column of ultrasonic sound, the air is creating new sounds (the sound that we originally converted to an ultrasonic wave). Since the sound that we hear is created right in the column of ultrasonic energy, it does not spread in all directions like the sound from a conventional loudspeaker, instead it stays locked tightly inside the column of ultrasonic energy. In order to hear the sound, your ears must be in line with the column of ultrasound, or, you can hear the sound after it reflects off a hard surface. For example, if you point the ultrasonic emitter toward a wall, you will only hear the audible sound after it has reflected off the wall. This is similar to shining a flashlight at a wall in a dark room. You do not see the light from the flashlight, you only see the spot of light on the wall. HSS works the same way, except instead of seeing the spot of light on the wall, you hear the "spot" of sound reflected from the wall. For stereo, a separate ultrasonic emitter is required for each channel of audio, one for the left channel and one for the right channel.
http://www.atcsd.com/tl_hss.html

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Mark
 

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I ran across this info and company at least a year a go, if not two, so it isn't exactly 'new'. Still a wicked cool idea.


The crux is:


Weaknesses of current loudspeaker technology is the use of crossovers. It is very difficult to produce a single driver than can reproduce the entire range of human hearing.


more on non-linearity- think about the last time you heard some one tuning a guitar. two of the notes are slightly out of tune. What you hear is both those notes, the sum of those notes, and the difference between those notes.


So let's say you play a tone @ 5,000 hertz, and a tone at 5,500Hz. You will hear 5,000 and 5,500. You will also hear (at a lower level) 10,500 and 500Hz.


Same thing would happen if you use 100,000Hz and 100,500Hz played a the same time. Only we can't hear 100k, 100.5k, 200.5k, only the 500. neat huh?


They are trying to create a driver that can efficiently reproduce high levels of sound from say 100,000 to 120,000. that's only a 20% frequency range.
 

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Cool! You can clean your teeth while you listen to music. Your dog will probably hate it though.


Sorry, couldn't resist :p :D
 
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