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I don't know much about amps and how they work and connecting them, but hearing everyone rave about their new amp they just purchased has me craving one, but I am afraid of doing something wrong and damaging my equipment since I am not too familiar. I have yamaha rx v2500 with athena f2 front, asc1 center and b2 for the rear with a pb10. What amp could I buy with my current setup? My center and rears are rated at 150watts so would that limit my amp options so that I don't blow them or would I be ok with say a 200w amp? Should I power all channels or just the front three or two?

Could I have some recommendations on some amps that are good, but wont put a hole in my pocket? I don't really know what are the price ranges of decent amps so I don't know where to set my budget, but how's $500? My room is 16x14x8 if that matters. thanks


p.s. Are there any links to where I could learn about amps?
 

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Since it's actually riskier underpowering your speakers rather than overpowering them, and that speaker ratings aren't "cast in stone", a solid 200 W/ch amp would be fine with your speakers.


If the amp comes with a variable gain, just be sure to set it low to start, then adjust it up as needed.


Just connect the amp using interconnects to your preout jacks on your receiver and move the speaker wire connections over. Then run YPAO to equalize the volume across all channels and you're done.


To minimize noise, it's recommended to keep your amp gain low and allow your receiver gain to be high. If it's too high (+10 to +12 dB or something) turn the amp gain up a bit and redo the calibration.


Many music listeners will use external amps on only their L & R channels. However HT uses the centre channel a lot as well, so the biggest bang for your buck in HT will be the front 3 channels. The rear channels aren't nearly as active except in multichannel SACD or DVD-A music.


The benefit of moving the L & R or L, C and R speakers to external amplification is that your receiver's power supply will be less strained. The remaining amps will have more power available to them and will be able to supply more power if needed.


Of course, if you want someday to move to a preamp/processor you need separate amplification for all channels.


Unfortunately amps are expensive. At $500, you'd have to go used or get a pro amp (see the "New amp is making me grin from ear to ear" thread). A pro amp might fit the bill. However most of them used balanced XLR inputs that don't accept the RCA unbalanced outputs from your receiver. No big deal, an inexpensive conversion cable will do the trick.
 

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teckademic, check your PM.
 
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