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This may be a fairly common occurance, but I've never seen/heard of it.


If you place indentical center channel speakers above and below the tv (use the center channel pre out on the receiver to a 2nd amp to drive the 2nd center) would this not help imaging, making it seem like center channel dialogue and sound effects are coming directly from the center of the screen, as opposed to above and below it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nsdjoe /forum/post/0


This may be a fairly common occurance, but I've never seen/heard of it.


If you place indentical center channel speakers above and below the tv (use the center channel pre out on the receiver to a 2nd amp to drive the 2nd center) would this not help imaging, making it seem like center channel dialogue and sound effects are coming directly from the center of the screen, as opposed to above and below it?

Wow. Deja vu. There was a thread on this exact scenario yesterday.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nsdjoe /forum/post/0


This may be a fairly common occurance, but I've never seen/heard of it.


If you place indentical center channel speakers above and below the tv (use the center channel pre out on the receiver to a 2nd amp to drive the 2nd center) would this not help imaging, making it seem like center channel dialogue and sound effects are coming directly from the center of the screen, as opposed to above and below it?

You are assuming that you'll hear a "phantom image" between the two speakers in a similar fashion to hearing a phantom image between a set of L/R stereo speakers. However, humans don't "image" from above and below the same way they do from left and right. The L/R imaging is caused by arrival time differences and level differences between the left and right ears. For example, a sound originating from your left arrives first at your left ear. Then the sound wave must go around your head to the right ear. By the time it hits your right ear, it's later in time and lower in level than the sound to your left ear. These are the clues that the ear/brain uses to determine L/R directionality, (similar to the way your eyes/brain determine 3-dimensionality by the differences between the L/R eyes.) Sound mixers can manipulate this phenomenon and "place" sonic images between the L/R speakers. However, you need to be seated exactly between the two speakers to "hear" the phantom image.


The same thing does not occur with speakers placed above and below the screen, especially if they are receiving the exact same signal. If the sound mixer has recorded the center as a single channel with no "height" information, you are essentially taking "mono" information and reproducing it through two speakers in physically different locations, above and below the screen. Therefore, you will not hear a "phantom" image between the two speakers anymore than if you took a mono center channel signal and sent it to two L/R speakers. What you will hear is an overly large soundstage filled with comb filtering effects from the interaction of the two speakers. It won't sound "better" and it certainly won't sound centered between the two speakers, (unless you are completely lucky to get them *exactly* the same distance away from the LP; even an inch or two difference and you'll have phase anomalies causing cancelations and reinforcements, (comb filtering) that will hurt the imaging and color the sound far more than the "benefit" of the additional output).


The best thing you can do with your center channel is to timber-match it to your L/R/SS speakers, and then calibrate it to the appropriate level to match the rest of your system. If you do this, dialogue should be intelligible and effects should be consistent as they "pan" through the center channel speaker.


Best.


Craig
 
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