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I live in a small town that has no TV station, but I am between two cities that have more than 12 analog stations that I can receive over distances of from 37 to over 70 miles from the transmitters over rolling relief. I am using a Channel Master 4248 for UHF and a simple Radio Shack cross dipole FM antenna for VHF reception.


I can receive six of these analog stations (3 VHF and 3 UHF) relatively clearly, the others quite clearly on some days. There are five other stations that I can receive but not well enough to enjoy on most days.


Three of these stations that I can receive very well (including 2 UHF stations) have just started transmitting DTV signals, the DTV transmitters being located on the same towers as their analog gear. Does this mean that if I can receive the analog signals relatively clearly, particularly UHF, I will also be able to receive the DTV signals well, and without many interruptions?


I note that the CEA website (not entirely accurate for my area)

http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.asp


shows that a smaller antennae is sufficient to receive the DTV transmissions from these stations than the larger antennae required for receiving analog signals.


I am planning to get a HDTV tuner card for a PC to start enjoying these DTV stations, but before I do, I would like to benefit from the experiences of others concerning analog compared to DTV signal requirements over relatively long distances. Is it the intention for DTV service footprints to equal the analog service footprints for each station but requiring a lessor antennae for reception?
 

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If you want to receive a station as far away as 70 miles, you will be pushing the limits and probably never be completely free of dropouts and blocking. If you have a digital station at over 50 miles you want, you will need top equipment..such as best yagi CM, HD9095 Winegard, Televes DAT75, or Blake21. Do a search on this forum to find out info on these antennas. Just type in a word. I have the best equipment but still get a few dropouts at 52 miles. Luckily I have other 'replacement' stations closer.
 

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It probably depends if the stations are at full power. Many aren't yet. Since you are receiving the existing stations well, you should not have problems. 70 miles is doable with a modest outdoor antenna. People have sucessfully gotten 100 to 120 mile reception with tall masts, very good antennas, and good line of sight. Go for it!


Ernie
 
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