AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, I know a bit about HDTV and DVD, but I'm confused about aspect ratio and perhaps I'm just making a bad assumption. I’ve had so many people give me conflicting information that I don’t know WHO is an expert on HD or DVD these days.


Here are the facts as I know them.


4x3 tv = 1.33:1

16.9 tv = 1.78:1


Most movies on DVD are labeled as:


2.35:1, 1.85:1, 1.66:1, & 1.33:1


I understand 2.35:1 and 1.33:1 as they appear as I would expect them to with either letterbox bars on the top and bottom or windows box bars on the sides.


Here's where my confusion comes in...

1.85:1 movies show full screen on 16x9 sets yet they SHOULD have tiny black letterbox bars as the TV is only 1.78:1 not 1.85:1.


The same with 1.66:1 as it is lower than 1.78:1 there should be tiny window box bars.


Lilo and Stitch is anamorphic 1.66:1 and so is Rocky Horror and they still appear full screen as the 1.85:1 films do. Mathematically that is impossible UNLESS there is some distortion (which I'd admit would be hard to see anyway.)


Is the answer that there is just some stretch distortion to every non 16x9 (1.78:1) DVD? If that is so I’m surprised it’s never mentioned. It’s not a lot, but there are a lot of film purists who would scream that a movie is labeled 1.85:1 yet is displayed 1.78:1. That appears to be needlessly confusing.


I've also been told it's overscan, but I've calibrated my 38" RCA Direct View HDTV to have only two pixels of overscan on each side. Four pixels either way can't account for the aspect ratio discrepancy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After asking the question I found this site... This guy does a pretty good job of explaining DVD ratios for 4x3 TVs and 16x9 TVs.



http://gregl.net/videophile/anamorphic.htm




He goes into a detail about 1.66:1 movies which is the most difficult ratio it seems because as he says, studios are “more interested in selling a product that works 11% better for the majority of the market than 18% better for those with widescreen televisions.â€




Lilo & Stitch (which my friend Steve and I picked up last night) is surprisingly 1.66:1 and anamorphic. Rocky Horror, Grave of the Fireflies and Beauty and the Beast are the only other ones I have that are both 1.66:1 and anamorphic. I always wondered how anamorphic would work unless they had side “windowbox†bars.




Viewing Lilo and Stitch on a properly configured 4x3 TV SHOULD result in black bars all around the picture. Clayton’s TV wouldn’t have this issue as his overscan issues are far more extreme than your average TV. This guy’s article seems to indicate that most analog TVs have enough overscan to hide them anyway.




Anyway this link might help someone other than me because 1.85:1 and 1.66:1 always confused me because both appear as full screen on a 16x9 TV. Mathematically 1.78:1 is in between these two and 1.85:1 should have small letterboxing and 1.66:1 should have slight windowboxing or they might opt to have a slight amount of distortion instead. I’m assuming most studios figure you will not notice the slight aspect change. I hand-calibrated my TV with only two pixels overscan on each side and the computer doesn’t appear to display these titles with the bars either so I can only assume that most studios opt for the aspect distortion because most people won’t see it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
I have noticed that many 2.35:1 movies are not really 2.35:1. For example, I measured the aspect ratio of training day vs. the Matrix. Both are supposed to be 2.35:1 but matrix is wider than training day when I measured it (I have a front projection system).


From many of my measurements, the actually measured aspect ratio of 2.35:1 movies can vary from 2.20:1 - 2.35:1. Quite a big difference.




James
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top