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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
if 4:3 ratio dvd's are 720x480 - then are the anamorphic dvd's also 720x480 resolution ? I was wondering this - because I want to buy a camcorder that will record true anamorphic 16:9 - then transfer the footage to dvd. But I am wondering if the editing software such as pinnacle or Ulead's MovieFactory2 will preserve the anamorphic image when buring back out to dvd since (corrrect me if I'm wrong) most software apps record out to dvd at 720x480. Any Help Here ??
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by sportster64
if 4:3 ratio dvd's are 720x480 - then are the anamorphic dvd's also 720x480 resolution ? I was wondering this - because I want to buy a camcorder that will record true anamorphic 16:9 - then transfer the footage to dvd. But I am wondering if the editing software such as pinnacle or Ulead's MovieFactory2 will preserve the anamorphic image when buring back out to dvd since (corrrect me if I'm wrong) most software apps record out to dvd at 720x480. Any Help Here ??
Yup. Anamorphic DVD is 720x480. (Non-anamorphic widescreen is 720x480 in a 4:3 aspect ratio with black bars, so the actual number of vertical pixels used is less than 480.)
 

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To the best of my knowledge, 16:9 and 4:3 DVD streams are the same resolution. I believe the aspect ratio can be set in the MPEG encoding options. And this allows a DVD player to auto-sense what type of stream is being played, and switch the HDTV into the appropriate widescreen mode to expand 16:9 material to fill the screen.


However, if the DVD authoring tools above don't include the 16:9 aspect ratio option, that's OK, because you should still be able to force an anamorphic stream to be displayed correctly, by manually selecting the correct widescreen mode on your TV.


Does that kinda make sense?
 

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Make sure you read everything on the following site

http://members.macconnect.com/users/...een/index.html


before you decide to make final purchase.


Basically, it's all 720x480 with 16:9 or 2:35:1 widescreen content vertically stretched to fill 720x480. The letter boxed widescreen DVDs are fitted inside 720x480 frame with black bars on top and bottom. You loose resolution because you are using much less than 480 vertical lines in letterboxed format.


When, DVD player plays the anamorphic DVD, it stretches the 720x480 form "horizontally" so the picture looks normal and not "thin and tall". Since all 480 lines of resolution are used, anamorphic widescreen DVDs look much better than letterboxed widescreen DVDs (sometimes also called enhanced for widescreen).


Best route from camcorder to anamorphic widescreen DVDs basically depends on your price range.


Most decent camcorders in
 

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Also, from

http://www.adamwilt.com/DV-FAQ-etc.html#widescreen


I'd rate the quality of_ 16:9 images as follows:


True 16:9 cameras, like the Sony DSR-500WS, The JVC DV700, and the Panasonic AJ-D610WA.


4:3 cameras with an anamorphic lens attachment.


Fake 16x9 from a Canon XL1 or GL1, or a Panasonic AJ-EZ1, AJ-D200 series, or the like.


4:3 cropped and stretched in post using an NLE


Fake 16x9 shot on a 4x3 Sony.


Mind you, this ranking does not take into account the fundamental quality differences in the different camera heads and lenses. I'm only discussing the relative qualities of the different means of generating a 16:9 image in what's still largely a 4:3 world.


Osho
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good information - but what about a DVD that has a 4:3 aspect ratio played on a 4:3 set - does the horizontal resolution get cropped and the vertical res stay at 480, I guess 640x480 ?


How is it that 720x480 does not work out to 16:9 or 1.78 - if my math serves me corrrectly - 720x480 is about 1.5 ?


Great links Osho - I am trying to find out if Ulead's Moviemaker2 will support transfer of "electroncally created 16:9 camcorder footage" to DVD - All the tech could tell me was that it writes out to DVD at 720x480 - so does that mean it will preserve the squashed anamorphic in the transfer back to DVD?


And yea - I am looking at possibly the JVC GR-DV800 - that has the letterbox mode and squish modes for doing the electronic 16:9 aspect with a native 4:3 CCD.
 

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The new Sony DCR-TRV80 is said to have a true widescreen mode thanks to its 2.0 megapixels chip. It also shoots progressive.
 

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Correct me if I am wrong, but the "apparent" resolution of an anamorphic DVD when played on a CRT based system actually has the vertical line density 1/3 greater than a non-anamorphic DVD. That means that the line density is equal to a non-anamorphic source with 640 lines. That is why it looks so much better. Correct? Bottom line is that it has the same resolution as a 720X640.

Thanks,

Bob
 

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Quote:
How is it that 720x480 does not work out to 16:9 or 1.78 - if my math serves me corrrectly - 720x480 is about 1.5 ?
The pixels aren't square shaped, neither for 4:3 nor 16:9. The pixel aspect ratio is 0.89:1 for the 4:3 format, and 1.19:1 in anamorphic 16:9. This means in 4:3 the pixels are slightly taller than they are wide, but just the opposite is true in 16:9.
 

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Quote:
what about a DVD that has a 4:3 aspect ratio played on a 4:3 set - does the horizontal resolution get cropped and the vertical res stay at 480, I guess 640x480 ?
Nope. NTSC equipment does not always use/display square pixels like an RGB monitor. The horizontal resolution of NTSC video can be as high as you want (1024x480 for example), and it will still display correctly on a 4:3 screen, provided it has the right pixel aspect. The same stream would look quite streched on an RGB monitor though.
Quote:
How is it that 720x480 does not work out to 16:9 or 1.78 - if my math serves me corrrectly - 720x480 is about 1.5 ?
Again, it's the pixel aspect that matters. I've created 16:9 SVCDs using a resolution of 480x480, and it will still look right on a widescreen TV provided the pixel aspect is correct.


This is actually what the word anamorphic means-- an image recorded at a different aspect ratio than it will be displayed. Even regular 4:3 standard definition video is slightly anamorphic in most cases.
 

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Quote:
Correct me if I am wrong, but the "apparent" resolution of an anamorphic DVD when played on a CRT based system actually has the vertical line density 1/3 greater than a non-anamorphic DVD. That means that the line density is equal to a non-anamorphic source with 640 lines. That is why it looks so much better. Correct? Bottom line is that it has the same resolution as a 720X640.
No, an anamorphic DVD has 720x480 resolution on a widescreen set but only 720x360 resolution on a 4:3 set, due to downconversion.
 

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Anamorphic DVDs look better on a widescreen HDTV, because they squeeze the full 720x480 resolution into a 16:9 shape (using a different pixel aspect), rather than crop the frame into that shape.
 

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I agree that only 360 lines are being used when you display a letterboxed DVD as the remaining 120 are being wasted producing black bars, but the resolution of the picture is still 720X480. When I play an anamorphic DVD of the same movie, the picture will not have black bars at the top and bottom of the screen. In order to have the proper geometric shape, I have to reduce the vertical gain of the projector by 1/3, which means that I am now using all 480 lines of information to create the picture, and not wasting 1/3 of them on producing black bars. While my total vertical resolution is still only 480 lines, the density of the picture portion is equivalent to 640 lines over the whole screen. Line density is what determines PQ, so what I am saying is that the "usable" resolution is equivalent to 720X640 on a 4:3 screen. That is why an anamorphic movie shown in OAR from a DVD looks much better than the same movie that is non-anamorphic in its OAR. Does this make sense?

Thanks,

Bob
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by sportster64


Great links Osho - I am trying to find out if Ulead's Moviemaker2 will support transfer of "electroncally created 16:9 camcorder footage" to DVD - All the tech could tell me was that it writes out to DVD at 720x480 - so does that mean it will preserve the squashed anamorphic in the transfer back to DVD?
I am not familiar with Ulead's Moviemaker2. There are chances that someone in the PC editing forum of DVInfo

http://www.dvinfo.net/conf/index.php?s=


will be able to answer that.


Osho
 

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Quote:
...That is why an anamorphic movie shown in OAR from a DVD looks much better than the same movie that is non-anamorphic in its OAR. Does this make sense?
Yes, an anamorphic DVD (or broadcast) will have greater vertical line density on a widescreen display than a letterboxed DVD because the letterbox has to be "zoomed" and cropped to create a 16:9 shape of the same dimensions
 

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OAR means "original aspect ratio". I just wanted to make sure that the comparisons were "apples to apples". My discussions were meant to help answer the original post; which is to say that the electrical signal of both anamorphic and non-anamorphic are identical with 720X480, but because of increased line density an anamorphic DVD requires a display device having higher resolution capabilities than non-anamorphic and the actual resolution of the picture is 1/3 higher.

Thanks,

Bob
 

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I have the jvc dvp7 it records with 640 lines but when I edit it trough Pinnacle studio 8 ( HIGHLY recomened) it digitally convert it to full 720x576 PAL 16:9. I have tried a lot of others combinations and at the time I bought it 1 year ago it was the state of art.
 

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It sounds as if you are going PC and not Mac, but Final cut pro 3 and DVD studio pro can preserve your 16:9. I shoot with a canon XL1 and while its not really the best 16:9, its possible.
 
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