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Well my buddy is thinking of getting a wide-screen TV. He wanted me to ask you all if they automatically fill the screen or if its an option in the DVD setting menu or in the DVD player menu somewhere? I don't have a wide-screen so I can't say and don't know anyone who has one. He would like to know so he can use this feature.
 

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Fill button but it cuts off the heads, of any movie with a aspect ratio more than 1.85:1 see my signature at the bottom.:)
 

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Short answer : The widescreen TV will fill up the screen with video if he plays anamoprhic DVDs, if the fill feature on the TV is enabled.


Long answer:

When he upgrades to the widescreen, all he needs to do is change the TV setting on the DVD player. Instead of a 4:3 TV, he needs to change it to 16:9.


A DVD player sends a higher voltage of its signal if it's being set for widescreen. This will let the TV know that it's being fed with anamorphic video. The TV will then adjust accordingly. With widescreen sets, you get the full benefit of anamorphic transfers.


Different sets have different names for the TV mode. He needs to read the manual. Tell him to ask for the manual when he is auditioning the TV.



fuad
 

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The only thing to watch out for: some movies are wider than the standard widescreen TV aspect ratio of 16:9. For those movies, you'll still see black bars on the top and bottom of a widescreen TV (although they'll be smaller than the ones you're used to seeing on a standard 4:3 TV). This is not a flaw, it's simply because movies are made in different shapes. At the movie theatre they adjust for the different shapes by changing the position of the curtains around the screen, but you can't do that with a standard TV set...
 

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Just to add my 2cents, movies like Attack of the Clones are 2:35 to 1 and therefore leave black bars, but being anamorphic the bars are about 1 to 1 1/2 inches top and bottom. If it were not anamorphic, the bars are about 3 inches top and bottom such as on "True Lies".

On the anamorphic transfers I don't even notice the bars, but on non-anamorphic they are as annoying as on a regular tv. In fact, I don't have any technical background, but it seems that the image is the same height as it would be on a 4:3 tv, just wider. It might just be my eyes though.

I've never regretted the cash outlay, and for me that's saying something. I'm like you, I don't know another person at all that has one. Everyone around here thinks I'm lost in outer space for buying one, but I love it!


Peace,

Rick
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by rickfromthesticks
Just to add my 2cents, movies like Attack of the Clones are 2:35 to 1 and therefore leave black bars, but being anamorphic the bars are about 1 to 1 1/2 inches top and bottom. If it were not anamorphic, the bars are about 3 inches top and bottom such as on "True Lies".

On the anamorphic transfers I don't even notice the bars, but on non-anamorphic they are as annoying as on a regular tv. In fact, I don't have any technical background, but it seems that the image is the same height as it would be on a 4:3 tv, just wider. It might just be my eyes though.

I've never regretted the cash outlay, and for me that's saying something. I'm like you, I don't know another person at all that has one. Everyone around here thinks I'm lost in outer space for buying one, but I love it!
AOTC and True Lies are both 2.35:1 aspect ratio films. (see www.imdb.com )


AOTC is anamorphic, True Lies is not. Anamorphic films (AOTC) already have the right vertical size, so they look right on a widescreen TV. Non-anamorphic films (True Lies) needs to be zoomed vertically so that the bars look about the same size on both films. Anamorphic films generally look better because they don't need that extra stage of zooming, which decreases the resolution.


Didn't you ever notice that people in True Lies looked short and wide the way you were watching it? See your TV manual to learn how to zoom the image to the correct aspect ratio.


That's why most DVD fans prefer anamorphic films, especially if they own a widescreen TV.
 
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