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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to buy the Panasonic pt51hx41 for size reasons. But I have a question about anamorphic and progressive. I know the Sony 53" can do anamporphic squeeze when played with a anamorphic dvd. Is this essentially the same as me playing a dvd through my progressive dvd player to my tv in progressive mode? Im pretty sure that the panny doesn't do anamorphic squeeze. Is the main purpose for anamorphic squeeze incase your using a standard dvd player that doesn't support progressive so you can get the higher resolution?


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Anamorphic and progressive scan are two different things. Each will individually provide an improvement. Anamorphic provides about 30% more lines of resolution than non-anamorphic - because it squeezes the widescreen image into the standard 480i picture. The DVD player unsqueezes. Progressive scan de-interlaces the 480i into 480p. I don't know the % improvement, but the difference is easy to see. I believe all DVD players can handle anamorphic DVDs. Only better DVD players output the 480p. By the way, there are two types of "progressive scan" dvd players. The cheaper ones do a simple line doubling, which may or may not improve the picture (depending on your TV). The better ones reverse the 3:2 pulldown inherent in transferring film to DVD - which captures more information and providing a superior picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have the panny dvd-rp91. So does anybody know what has better improvement. Anamorphic or progressive?


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you are somewhat confused about the purpose of anamorphic transfers. when a DVD contains an anamorphic version of the film, that means it's a widescreen film where the "extra wide" parts of the film are "smushed in" to a standard 4x3 shape, containing all 480 visible lines of resolution.


on a widescreen TV, the TV "unsmushes" it, and the picture is still made up of 480 visible scan lines of picture information.


if you were to try to watch all 480 lines of resolution on a standard 4x3 television, you would still be watching the "smushed" version, where everyone was tall and thin. to fix this, you set up your DVD player and tell it you have a 4x3 television. The DVD player then does a "downconversion" - on most (all?) players, it basically discards 1 out of ever 4 lines, and uses the lines that frees up to paint the black bars on the top and bottom of the screen. In this way, you lose lines of resolution - no longer do you see all 480 lines, now you're down to 360 scan lines with actual picture information, and 60 each on top and bottom which do nothing but pain black bars.


The "squeeze" trick that the sony's (among others) pull off is to make the 4x3 sometimes act line a widescreen set. Basically, it takes its 480 scan lines and also smushes them in vertically, causing a picture with all 480 scan lines to appear in proportion (rather than tall and thin, which is what a regular 4x3 TV does).


the bottom line: if your TV is not widescreen, and if it doesn't do the squeeze trick, then the anamorphic transfers on DVD's are worthless to you - the DVD player will have to downconvert the image to paint the black bars. i don't think there's anything you can do about it.


progressive scan, on the other hand, is something that everyone with an HDTV ready TV can benefit from. Basically, your TV receives a 480p signal (rather than 480i), which contains twice as much picture information. the catch is whether or not that extra picture information is real, useful information or not. as fred mentioned, cheap progressive players just line double the image, which doesn't really benefit you at all (expecially since your set probably has its own internal line doubler). better ones do better forms of deinterlacing, which is the creation of an image which doesn't suffer from a multitude of picture artifacts largely caused by the changes between film and video modes.


Again, the benefit you actually see here may be impacted by the quality of the line doubler your TV set includes. Some good sets may rival the deinterlacer in the DVD player. The one thing the DVD players have going for them is the ability to do their work in the digital domain - the TV set has to receive an analog signal, convert to digital, work it's magic, then reconvert to analog, which will lose some picture quality.


dinesh



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DVI/HDCP sucks. DFAST sucks. Boycott JVC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Danny thanks for the info. That is what i was getting at. Now the tough part. Does the panny pt51hx41 do that? There site says 16x9 mode and another site lists it as doing verticle compression. Thanks again
 
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