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I got a Pioneer DEH-X2700UI car stereo installed that I am playing on my stock 2002 Toyota Tacoma speakers. The stereo has an equalizer, but also has high/low pass filters (which I have no experience with). Problem is when I get the bass to where I want it, the bass drum track is overpowering. If I lower the 80Hz EQ setting so the bass drum is not so loud then the rest of the bass is also way too low. Any advice on how I can remedy this? There is an equalizer pre-set that is called "Powerful" where the bass sounds great except then tinny high end gives me a head ache. Unfortunately there is no way to tweek the pre-sets and I can not find the actually numbered settings for that preset so I can't reproduce it manually.
 

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For one. Play something else and see if it changes. Second. Those stock speakers are more than likely the problem. The harmonics of the cab interior/materials are playing games with you. I would at some point take it to a pro and have good speakers put in and some sound deadening and what not.
 

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Buy a UMIK-1
http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

Then you can use REW (which is free) on a laptop/pc to figure out what the frequency response is.
http://www.roomeqwizard.com/

You'll probably want to mod it for up to 130db usage: (It's stock operating range is 40db to 105db, and 20hz to 20khz)
http://www.avsforum.com/forum/155-diy-speakers-subs/1797489-massively-clipped-umik-1-a.html

It's really suited as a measurement mic, rather than an SPL meter. It is very accurate up to about 125db or so, which is more-than enough for basic troubleshooting and system tuning / EQ analysis.


If you want to know your MAX SPL, then you'll need to spend more bread:
http://spllabusa.com/us/products/bass-meters/usb-bass-meter.html


The UMIK won't fix the problem, but it will show you what the problem is. And REW can give you EQ suggestions.
You'll probably need to buy a car-based subwoofer EQ system (I'm not a car person so I can't help you there.)

I used it's suggestions and it got my theater horn sub pretty flat.


I use the $100 professionally calibrated version of the UMIK which is rated for 5hz to 25KHz analysis (because my sealed subs to go 4hz.)
http://cross-spectrum.com/measurement/calibrated_umik.html
 

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if what you listen to is hyped in the chest kick region, really 50 - 60 Hz generally, and you dislike that (I know I do) then you need to pull down the 40 or 50 Hz range, not the next harmonic at 80 Hz. If you have a classic car subwoofer, it is specifically designed to be fully 10 dB too hot somewhere between 40 and 80 Hz. Find its port and stuff a sock or towel into it. Magically, the hyped output will go away. But depending on design of the sub, everything might get a little lightweight, too. I had folks I thought I could trust build a sub for my Saab, way way back in the day. Told them I wanted flat. Got the car back, sat down and put on Miles' Kind of Blue. Sounded like utter sh!t, and evensub builder boy could tell, and promptly put a plug in the port. He just didn't believe me when I said "flat." Port blocked, I was pretty flat. To my ears, port plugged, Ms. Carey's first album, which is bass-based, still hit plenty hard. And I could actually distinguish the kick drum from the general bwaaaaah. A positive development for me, but I'm a little diffnt.
 
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