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Sorry to dig this up, but I just put 2 of the Noctua PWM fans into my NX6000D and it feels like there's significantly less airflow out of the front of the amp. Is that normal? I hooked them up properly splicing the yellow fan wire to the red amp wire, and the black to black. They're definitely running, and they're basically silent, but it seems like they're not pushing as much air as the stock fans. When I was sitting in front of the amp, I could feel the air from the original fans, but now with the new fans I can only barely feel it if I press my hand up against the grill.
 

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Sorry to dig this up, but I just put 2 of the Noctua PWM fans into my NX6000D and it feels like there's significantly less airflow out of the front of the amp. Is that normal? I hooked them up properly splicing the yellow fan wire to the red amp wire, and the black to black. They're definitely running, and they're basically silent, but it seems like they're not pushing as much air as the stock fans. When I was sitting in front of the amp, I could feel the air from the original fans, but now with the new fans I can only barely feel it if I press my hand up against the grill.
I did a swap with the Noctua PWM fan on an NX3000 and I agree that the air flow is reduced. I believe that is a big reason it makes less noise. I have built and overclocked many gaming computers and have used a lot of different fans. I found the biggest difference in sound is the speed and airflow. Not so much the brand or rubber buffers or high tech bearings. Although I did pay up for the Noctua.

Less speed is less sound. I think the stock fan was overkill for in home use. It think the airflow with the Noctua is enough for most users. I hope anyway.
 

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I did a swap with the Noctua PWM fan on an NX3000 and I agree that the air flow is reduced. I believe that is a big reason it makes less noise. I have built and overclocked many gaming computers and have used a lot of different fans. I found the biggest difference in sound is the speed and airflow. Not so much the brand or rubber buffers or high tech bearings. Although I did pay up for the Noctua.



Less speed is less sound. I think the stock fan was overkill for in home use. It think the airflow with the Noctua is enough for most users. I hope anyway.
Yeah, for HT use the stock fans are serious overkill imo.

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If reduced airflow is a byproduct of all these quieter replacement fans then you could accomplish the same thing by keeping the stock fan and splicing in a simple fan control rheostat that would allow you to dial in a lower fan speed with an appropriate balance of cooling flow and reduced noise.
 

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Let me preface by saying that I did the fan mod on my NU6000 and have been happy with the near-silence it achieved. With that said, I would have been OK with probably up to 50% more flow before I actually noticed the noise. I have watched quite a few movies and haven't had problems, so I think it's fine for "normal" HT use, but if you find you're regularly bouncing off your clip light then you may want a little more air flow (or maybe not).

My understanding when I was reading about this is that there are 2 ways fan performance is measured. CFM (cubic feet per minute of air moved) and static pressure, which is kind of how "hard" the fan blows? Think about blowing up a balloon. You don't need to blow a lot of air really fast, but you do need to blow hard... this may not be the best analogy but it's all I have right now. The stock fans were strong static pressure performers, and that's hard to come by in a replacement model. Most computer type fans focus on CFM and keeping quiet. A lot of people more knowledgable than me have tested fans and swapped out other models, and the Noctua seems to be adequate for most, so I figured it was good enough for me. I hope it will prove to be in the long run.
 

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Static pressure fans are designed for use with water cooling radiators or systems with high resistance.
 

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am I reading this thread correctly as

1. nocturnas splice into the wiring
2. arctic is plug and play? I saw 1 or 2 references but am wondering if I missed something. Seems like plug and play would be ideal, although not hard to butt splice two wires.

I'm getting ready to order for a nx3000, nx6000 and a nx4-6000
 

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am I reading this thread correctly as

1. nocturnas splice into the wiring
2. arctic is plug and play? I saw 1 or 2 references but am wondering if I missed something. Seems like plug and play would be ideal, although not hard to butt splice two wires.

I'm getting ready to order for a nx3000, nx6000 and a nx4-6000
You can do either method with noctua fans, see my posts on the prior page. I’ve done a few with butt splices and a few with cutting down the plug. I copied smcmillan2’s method and cut down the pwm 4-wire pin to 2-wire size. Works like a charm and it’s the method I’ll be using going forward. I posted a pic on the prior page.
 

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Finally did the swap last week, After a year Of living with the shroud padded with gorilla tape to increase its mass. Which Reduced the noise but Did not eliminate it

Happy with the results of the swap. Now it is Dead silent in my room. My first impression was that it did not seem to move Much air. The noise of the previous one, may have given me a false impression of performance. I used the little silicon spears to attach the fan seem to work well enough, and might prevent vibration from being transmitted into the chassis.
 

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Hi,

I've just done the fan swap on a NX6000D. The fan swap went smoothly (my son is quite handy with this kind of thing). I used two of these fans


The problem is there isn't much of a reduction in noise at all, it's marginal at best. On other threads people use descriptions like "silent" and "whisper quiet" after the fans have been replaced. My result definitely isn't anything like that. We watched Frozen last night and the sound of the fans annoyed me every time there was a silent scene.

The fans above that I have used are the 5V PWM version. Is there any issue using the 5V rather than the 12V?

Any thoughts are appreciated.

Thanks
 

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I think you found the problem. I have never tried 5v fans at 12v, but I can't imagine them lasting long. The proper 12v fans are very quiet.
 

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Thanks for the response.

I'm a little confused. When I look at the information Noctua provides on Amazon both the 12v and 5v fans are exactly the same in terms of performance. If you scroll down on the link below to the product description part of the page you see the following.

The 5v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)
The 12v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)


I don't mind trying the 12v fans but there doesn't seem much point spending another £28.00 if Noctua say the RPM and noise specs are the same.

Cheers
 

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Thanks for the response.

I'm a little confused. When I look at the information Noctua provides on Amazon both the 12v and 5v fans are exactly the same in terms of performance. If you scroll down on the link below to the product description part of the page you see the following.

The 5v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)
The 12v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)


I don't mind trying the 12v fans but there doesn't seem much point spending another £28.00 if Noctua say the RPM and noise specs are the same.

Cheers
The 5V fans will run at full speed when the unit kicks on. It starts by supplying around 5-6V I think. If the thermal load increases, it will kick it up to 12V. At that point, 5V fans will probably bite the dust from receiving 12V.

If you put in 12V fans, they will be running at very low speed (very little air movement) when the unit starts and they are only being given 5V. That’s why people say the 12V are so quiet, they’re mostly running with 5V and are at half the speed. With 5V on a 12V fan, don’t even pay attention to the 33 or whatever CFM those fans are rated for. You’re getting a fraction of that.
 

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Thanks for the response.

I'm a little confused. When I look at the information Noctua provides on Amazon both the 12v and 5v fans are exactly the same in terms of performance. If you scroll down on the link below to the product description part of the page you see the following.

The 5v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)
The 12v 4 pin PWM fan has a RPM of 2200 and an acoustical noise level of 17.7 dB(A)


I don't mind trying the 12v fans but there doesn't seem much point spending another £28.00 if Noctua say the RPM and noise specs are the same.

Cheers
?? No no no.
The 5v has the fan motor wired for 5v.
The 12v has the fan motor wired for 12v.
The specs are for the correct input voltage.. they are NOT the same fan.

If you run the 5v fan at 12v you will very likely have a burned up fan motor in no-time flat.
Do not do this. You are asking for disaster.
 

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Thanks for all the replies guys.

So I need to get the 12v fans is the message.

I may be overthinking this but if the 12v fans are mostly running at half speed does that not mean a build up of heat that in the long term is bad for the amp? If this is a real concern are there any other options or will the 12v Noctua NF-A8 PWM be provide adequate cooling?

Cheers
 

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Yes, get the Noctua 12v that is listed. It will provide adequate cooling.
Many people (including myself) have been running this exact fan for months, or years. Running in a variety of setups; racks, av shelves, tv cabinets.. etc. I've never seen an issue relating to over-temp, or thermal protection shut downs.

The amplifier regulates the fan speed based on the current temp of the monitored components. Unit gets hot, fan speeds up..unit is cool, fan slows down.
 
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