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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to set up an antenna to receive OTA digital broadcasts. Here is what I'm trying to get:


Station Channel Network City Compass Distance


WILL-DT 9 PBS Urbana IL 263? 19.8

WBUI-DT 22 WB DECATUR IL 255? 31.4

WAND-DT 18 ABC DECATUR IL 254? 29.5

WICD-DT 41 NBC CHAMPAIGN IL 93? 20.4

WCIA-DT 48 CBS Champaign IL 284? 8.1

WRSP 55 FOX SPRINGFIELD IL 254? 63.8



As you can see, I've got one VHF channel in the mix and need to reach almost 65 miles for the furthest station. I want to put the antenna if the attic (a very high attic, fortunately) but can't use a rotor.


Any suggestions on how to sort out this mess? I'd prefer to get it right the first time, since trial and error is going to require a lot of climbing into hard to access attic areas.


Thanks for any advice.


MIKE


P.S. For some reason the degree sign got changed to a question mark.
 

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Channel 9 since its close you can probably pick up OK with a UHF antenna, then you can go for a higher gain UHF-only model like the Channel Master 4221 or 4228. I'd forget about that 63.8 mile station - thats too far. Under 35 miles is pretty easy. If that NBC station is 93degrees you would need a rotor for that one.
 

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Mike: As I mentioned in the other thread, I do pretty well with just a directional uhf antenna in the attic. WRSP isn't perfect, but most nights I get no break-ups at all. For the NFL game last Sunday, reception was poorer with a 1 sec breakup occuring maybe every 15-20 mins.


One option which I didn't mention before is to use two independent antennas at opposite ends of the attic for the opposite compass headings. I have actually done this becuase I thought I would need it for wicd. As it turns out, wicd comes in perfectly through the rear end of the single uhf antenna and I don't even need the other antenna for digital channels. I do use it for will analog 12 since I don't have dish/cable at present.


My HDTV receiver has two antenna inputs and you can assign the channels to the antennas so it seamlessly selects channel without your even knowing which antenna its drawing from. So it's completely transparent to the user.


There was no way I was going to put up with the hassle of a rotor, and like you my attic probably doesn't have enough swing room anyway.


jtv
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by ThumperBoy
Channel 9 since its close you can probably pick up OK with a UHF antenna, then you can go for a higher gain UHF-only model like the Channel Master 4221 or 4228. I'd forget about that 63.8 mile station - thats too far. Under 35 miles is pretty easy. If that NBC station is 93degrees you would need a rotor for that one.
I picked up 13 stations today from over 77 miles away, even though antennaweb said I couldn't get even one. Don't ever give up without at least trying.
 

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Local topography and antenna height have a lot to do with distance reception. For an outdoor antenna under normal conditions, 60 miles is a reasonable limitation. In an attic, you're going to need luck.


If your location is relatively high and you have few obstructions, 77 miles is doable, but you'd better be *up there* or the tower must be. I know that Mt. Wilson is a mile up in the air - most digital transmitters are closer to 300-450 meters.


If you put a Channel Master 3021 in your attic, you'd probably be able to use a rotor. It only takes a 2' radius. The 4228 is a better choice for distant reception, but it's twice as wide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The topography between me and the 63 miles away station resembles that of a billiard table, so while it might be a stretch, it also might be worth trying.


Thanks for all the advice. Now if Dish just just get some HD receivers out to installers.


MIKE
 

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jtv,


Canyou tell me how you hooked two UHF antennas together? What did you use to join the two? Did you use channel traps, equal length antennas, etc that I have seen recommended? Thanks.
 

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kmadden:


There are two usual goals with multiple antennas. The first is to use two (or more) identical antennas to boost gain. There are a variety of details which must be gotten right to get any gain from this approach. See posts here on avs and elsewhere.


The second approach is to use two antennas pointing in different directions to pick up different channels. Here there are two issues: (i) keep sufficient physical separation to prevent intereference, (ii) get the signals down to the receiver without interference.


As you noted, there are a variety of approaches - including single channel traps, uhf-vhf splitters etc. I am afraid I can't be of much help, because I took the simple brute force approach. I ran independent rg6 leads down from each antenna to separate inputs on the hdtv receiver. Thus the signals never come into contact.


jtv
 

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Two separate OTA antenna inputs on the receiver? That's handy. Sorry I misinterpreted your original email. Thanks for your thoughts though.


I have sigals 120 degrees apart, both 35 miles away- so I'm looking for the two antennas in different direction solution.
 
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