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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for a strong antenna amplifier. If you know of a good one, please let me know. Also, what would an amplifier do to cable TV?


Thank you in advance.


[This message has been edited by HDCblGuy (edited 08-18-2001).]
 

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Wineguard AP4800 is a good UHF antenna pre-amp, 28db, VHF passing. The ChannelMaster 77xx series is good also, but some are not VHF passing. It should not effect cable as it should not be mixed with cable, the lines should be seperate to an STB.BTW this should be in the hardware forum.


Tim


[This message has been edited by rudolpht (edited 08-18-2001).]
 

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Channel Master Titan 7775 is the best for UHF
 

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What are you trying to acomplish? Antenna amplifiers only compensate for cable loss or boost the signal to overcome splitters in a multiple TV setup.


Amplifiers will not bring in signals that are not there to begin with. This is a commen mis-conception. If the signal is too weak in your area to produce voltage on the antenna, the amplifier has nothing but noise to amplify. Furthermore, if the input is noisy, the amplifier will boost this noise along with the signal. Basic rule of thumb is that if you can't get a margional signal without an amplifier, adding one won't help.


As for cable the same rule applies. They should only be used if you are feeding many TV / VCR's off the feed. Because cable signals occupy almost every space in the allocated television frequency spectrum, the can add harmonics whct translate to beat patterns in the picture as well as double images, one channel negative over the channle you want. If the cable company is receiving a poor signal, there is nothing you can do at your end to improve it.
 

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Glimme-

If I can interpret what you had for HDCblguy, it seems that your advice for him and myself (I am about 40 miles "out")is to avoid an amplifier or pre-amp if at all possible...so then would you advise a whopper-from-hell UHF antenna for maximum reception. That was my current plan, with a Winegard CA-9095 (about 8' w/ a lot of elements and reportedly a flat and very directional response). Any further input for us?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by WOLVERNOLE:
Glimme-

If I can interpret what you had for HDCblguy, it seems that your advice for him and myself (I am about 40 miles "out")is to avoid an amplifier or pre-amp if at all possible...so then would you advise a whopper-from-hell UHF antenna for maximum reception. That was my current plan, with a Winegard CA-9095 (about 8' w/ a lot of elements and reportedly a flat and very directional response). Any further input for us?
Exactly, antenna gain is what you need. The larger the antenna, the more gain it has. This gain does not have the noise penalty an amplifier does.

 

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If you need a uhf power amp, the Channel Master 7775 is the best.


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PeterDz
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I only live about a maximum of 20 miles from all of the broadcast antennas. I just really want to avoid putting an antenna on my roof. Any alternatives?


Thanks!
 

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Quote:
Antenna amplifiers only compensate for cable loss or boost the signal to overcome splitters in a multiple TV setup.
They can also compensate for a mediocre receiver front end, if their noise figure is lower than than of the receiver. FCC requirements for analog tuner mandate that the noise figure must be 7 dB or better. The CM and Winegard pre-amps mentioned here are both much better than this, so they sometimes can help in reception even if you're not driving a long cable. But they are very prone to overload in areas of strong signal strength.


In general, if the stations you're trying to receive are snowy, then the signal strength at the receiver input is too close to the noise floor of the receiver. A good low-noise pre-amp may help. With digital stations, it can be hard to tell if a pre-amp will do any good without test equipment.




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You have a right to install OTA and dish antennas on property under your control.


See http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 
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