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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old antenna that was on my house when I bought it, and want to see if it will pull in the HD locals before I go and have a new one installed. Question is, I don't see any sort of ground wire coming off of this thing, what would I need to do to, if anything, to properly ground it?


Can I just install a grounding block like my D* system uses?


Thanks!
 

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Hello.


I think you'll find tons of detail by using the SEARCH feature in this specific forum.


The grounding issue is pretty well understood and articulated. It is not a singular ground, by the way, but includes both the physical antenna and the coax.


regards,


patrick
 

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 Here's the best explanation I've found for grounding. I'm doing it this weekend with a full antenna/mast/rotor install on my roof.
 

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It's incorrect though. The best method is to connect to the main building ground. If a separate ground rod is used, it must be bonded to the main building ground. It also gives the impression that a lightning strike can be safely routed to ground. That ain't gonna happen. The purpose is to bleed off any static discharge to prevent a strike.
 

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I understand that bleeding off static discharge would be the reason for a ground connected to the coax, but then what's the purpose of the ground from the mast itself? Same?


And I agree, it should say connect to the building ground (which is exactly what I plan to do this weekend).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by bierboy
I understand that bleeding off static discharge would be the reason for a ground connected to the coax, but then what's the purpose of the ground from the mast itself? Same?
It's actually more the mast for static discharge than the coax as wind driven dust particles rubbing the mast can cause static buildup and the mast has more area. One reason code requires grounding of the coax is if downed electrical lines make contact, or especially break to coax and make contact, the current will be harmlessly carried to ground. That's why the grounding blocks must be close to the coax entry point to limit the dangerous contact area.
 

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Greywolf, thanks for all the info. I really appreciate it, since I'm doing this on Saturday. When you say the grounding block should be close to the coax entry point, do you mean entry to the house? (forgive my ignorance)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by bierboy
When you say the grounding block should be close to the coax entry point, do you mean entry to the house? (forgive my ignorance)
Yes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info everyone. I'm still a bit confused on how to terminate the mast ground. I thought that a sufficiently long enough grounding rod was all I needed.


Pat, when you say the wire must be connected to the building ground, do you mean the cold water pipe? Is this code?


In order to accomplish this, the ground wire would have to enter my basement. It seems to me that this could be dangerous. Under normal static discharge situations, I would think it would be harmless, but what in the event of a nearby or direct lightening strike??
 

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AVSforum member Signal posted the following helpful sites. The first link applies directly to your situation. If a water pipe is used, it must be a cold water pipe that is all metal throughout the house and has a bonding strap to the main electrical box near where the pipe and the electrical service enter the house. This this may be hard to check, I like to use the metal raceway through which the electrical service enters the house. Check where you telephone service is grounded for a place to use too. Running a ground wire indoors is not a problem and is permitted by code.


National Electrical Code - Search for "dish"

The information there also applies to antenna grounding.
http://forums.nfpa.org:8081/necfaq/necsrch.htm


Preventing Damage Due to Ground Potential Difference
http://www.cinergy.com/surge/ttip08.htm


PSIHQ - Grounding Requirements
http://www.psihq.com/iread/strpgrnd.htm


PolyPhaser Technical Information
http://www.polyphaser.com/ppc_technical.asp


Tower Page - see N1LO's GUYED TOWER TOPIC SUMMARY
http://www.qsl.net/n1lo/tower.htm
 
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