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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In order to figure out what kind of antenna I need and where I can place it, I checked out AntennaWeb.org and TVFool.com. I got different results, and I'm curious which I should follow in order to get the channels I want. The actual numbers are the same, but the recommendations are different. Here are the channels, dB, distance, and compass heading:


CBS 72.4 7.3m 42°

Fox 71.9 6.9m 37°

NBC 70.4 7.6m 98°

ABC 68.6 10.5m 53°

CW 68.4 10.5m 53°


These are all from TV Fool (obviously, since AntennaWeb gives less info), but all the headings and ranges are the same. I told TV Fool that my antenna would be 8 feet high, and it lists all paths as "LOS" and all are green, meaning that a set-top antenna would be sufficient. However, since the compass headings vary more than 20°, I know that I will have issues using a uni-directional antenna. Furthermore, I'm concerned that AntennaWeb lists the ABC and CW signals as needing a "Red UHF" antenna.


My preference is to buy a relatively cheap antenna and put it in the attic. I'm guessing that since I'm close enough to the signals, my only issue would be ghosting - if any at all. Is it likely that I could buy a DB2 HDTV antenna, point it generally ENE (something around 67°) and get a solid signal, without an amplifier? I completely understand that there are many issues affecting signal strength and quality (buildings in the way, landscape problems, etc.), I'm just asking for a general-rule-of-thumb kind of answer.


Thanks for your help!


Edit: My apologies, here is the TVfool link to my results
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 27HoursLater /forum/post/18236505


Is it likely that I could buy a DB2 HDTV antenna, point it generally ENE (something around 67°) and get a solid signal, without an amplifier?

If all of those channels are UHF, then I would say yes. You have a very strong signal, according to TVFool. Virtually any antenna should work fine, including a cheap indoor antenna, although you may get multipath interference (ghosting in analog days) if you have lots of tall buildings around you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 /forum/post/18236860


It would be more helpful if we could actually SEE your TVfool report page instead of an incomplete extract of it.

Sorry, I linked to it above now.
 

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The stations you want are all UHF and all in the 68-72 range in the NM(dB) column, which is very strong. Before you start futzing around with running an antenna cable to the attic, go to Radio Shack and get their budget TV antenna, catalog #15-1874:

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2103077


Unscrew the rabbit ears (you don't need them) and experiment with the loop for a while. If you need more room to maneuver, get an extra length of RF cable and an inline coupler:

http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2103648


I think there's a good chance it will be all you need. I use one of these to pick up our strongest station on a small TV in the dining area so we can watch news during breakfast. That station comes in pretty solidly at 48 NM(dB), which is a lot weaker than your stations, even though the transmitter is on the "wrong" side of the house.
 

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+1 on jtbell's suggestion. That specific antenna usually works very well in your situation.


When you assemble the antenna, leave the rabbit ear dipole rods off of it, as they are for VHF channels, which you don't have in your area.


Aim the loop East/NorthEast. Although with your signal strengths, it will likely work regardless of the direction you aim it.


Don't waste your money on gimmicky looking antennas and do not buy an amplified antenna.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by arxaw /forum/post/18237574


+1 on jtbell's suggestion. That specific antenna usually works very well in your situation.


When you assemble the antenna, leave the rabbit ear dipole rods off of it, as they are for VHF channels, which you don't have in your area.


Aim the loop East/NorthEast. Although with your signal strengths, it will likely work regardless of the direction you aim it.


Don't waste your money on gimmicky looking antennas and do not buy an amplified antenna.

OK, so I FINALLY got all set up last night and took it for a test run. I got a lot of channels last night, but none of them came in exceptionally well. My next step is to try a better antenna. I can get a DB2 or DB4, or I can look for an amplified antenna. I know it's been awhile and I might not get a response from you specifically, but why not look at an amplified antenna?


Assuming you all like the DB2 idea next, should I get two and point them in different directions (see my original post for compass differences of the various stations) or just get one and point it in the general direction of both signals?
 

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...because amplified antennas indoors are usually a waste of electricity. You just don't benefit a lot from an indoor amp if you have a decent antenna to start with.


A single DB2 or C1/C should easily cover all your KC locals from OP.


That reminds me, I need to send another DB2 to my niece in Olathe for her boyfriend in OP... Hers picks up the Topeka UHF channels off the back, indoors, even.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy /forum/post/18302460


Was there a three-way splitter between that antenna and the television you were watching?

Nope, I had the cheap antenna (actually got one from Microcenter, basically the same as the Radio Shack one above) screwed directly into the Hauppauge tuner on my computer. It was up on a shelf in the room.


I'm not sure what my signal strengths are like... do you know how I can tell?
 

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I thought you were going from the attic to 3 televisions. Have you tried this antenna directly into the other sets? Bear in mind also, all cheap antennas are not created equal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry, I forgot how long ago I was in my planning process when I did this.


No, I'm going to my one computer only, then I'm streaming what I get to two TVs. No splitters at all. I eventually will try an antenna in the attic, but I thought I'd try a small antenna in the room first, then a larger antenna in the attic, and if all else fails, I'll have to go outside with it.
 

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Antenna location is a huge factor determining indoor reception. If you can add cable and try various locations in search of a hot spot for signal, that might work. TVFool says there is plenty of signal at your location, but that doesn't ensure that it is getting inside to your antenna. If signal is poor at all locations, then amplification could be called for. I wouldn't go amped unless attic reception is poor and you want to avoid outdoors.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 27HoursLater /forum/post/18302555


Nope, I had the cheap antenna (actually got one from Microcenter, basically the same as the Radio Shack one above) screwed directly into the Hauppauge tuner on my computer. It was up on a shelf in the room.

Try jtbell's previously recommended antenna from RS , but in another room, far away from computers and other RF interference. Use a barrel splice to add a longer coax to the antenna. You can return it if it doesn't work.


Location, location, location.
 
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