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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am adding a second HDTV to our home and want to know if there is a special splitter I should use for splitting the signal from my existing 100 ft. RG6 cable run from a rooftop antenna (CM 3021, no amp) to the new TV. The split would occur at about the halfway point of the existing run and would only be about 10 ft. of additional cable. Thanks for any help.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Iwanthd
I am adding a second HDTV to our home and want to know if there is a special splitter I should use for splitting the signal from my existing 100 ft. RG6 cable run from a rooftop antenna (CM 3021, no amp) to the new TV. The split would occur at about the halfway point of the existing run and would only be about 10 ft. of additional cable. Thanks for any help.
You don't say what your signal strength is, as far as whether it is marginal or not. Theoretically, any splitter should decrease the signal on each side by 3db (equal to 1/2.) There's usually a little more loss because nothing is perfect, so figure 3.5db. Unless you're borderline getting a signal, almost any splitter should be okay. If you want the best, get one from Channel Master or buy the "Gold Series" one for $10 from Radio Shack.


If you lose one or more stations after inserting the splitter, a preamplifier might be a wise investment. But don't buy one if you don't need it. The signal-to-noise ratio is much more important than the absolute signal strength.
 

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Just use a regular coax splitter.


If you notice dropouts or weak signals on either TV after adding the splitter, install a high quality LOW NOISE preamp. The Channel Master CM 7777 is an excellent one.


Preamps are two-piece. The amp is installed on the antenna mast as close to the antenna as possible. The power supply may be installed anywhere and feeds through the existing coax. If you install the power supply behind one of the TVs, the other TV will need a DC block to prevent DC voltage from entering its antenna jack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the response. I have a Panny STB that does not have a signal strength meter but I know that all of our local stations are broadcasting low power signals from temporary transmitters.


arxaw-

Thanks for the advice, where exactly is the DC block installed?
 

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I recently got rid of my satellite temporarily, and have resorted to a standard cable feed. I have a HD Antenna as well. Is there a way to split these two inputs? I have one RG6 running down the wall. I'd run another but it's a two story. This was no problem with a diplexer before, but the cable and Antenna paired doesn't work. Is there a different splitter I can use?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by JSB
I recently got rid of my satellite temporarily, and have resorted to a standard cable feed. I have a HD Antenna as well. Is there a way to split these two inputs? I have one RG6 running down the wall. I'd run another but it's a two story. This was no problem with a diplexer before, but the cable and Antenna paired doesn't work. Is there a different splitter I can use?
Since cable and OTA use the same frequencies, there's no easy way to use a diplexer. However, you could use Radio Shack's remote switcher that works as an A-B switch.
 

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He would still have to run 2 cables, even with the A/B switch. You can't install the RS remote A/B switch outside.
 

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His STB probably has two inputs anyway.. one for OTA and one for cable.. combine only to split again later?? pay somebody young to run the second cable.. :)
 
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