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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seems like all the companies that offer 1080p 32's at 120Hz are sort of hedging with words like "effective" and "smooth motion", etc. Do any of the 32's have a true120hz refresh rates? Frustrating because the store displays rarely show anything but slow moving demo's that always look good. I'd like to see them running a sporting event or something with a lot of screen action.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xlr8r  /t/1522306/any-1080p-32s-with-a-true-120hz-referesh-rate/0_60#post_24475141


Seems like all the companies that offer 1080p 32's at 120Hz are sort of hedging with words like "effective" and "smooth motion", etc. Do any of the 32's have a true120hz refresh rates? Frustrating because the store displays rarely show anything but slow moving demo's that always look good. I'd like to see them running a sporting event or something with a lot of screen action.
 

Let's see if I can just list out the simplest of issues, because this question is a gateway to a huge topic.

 

1. Yes, there are boatloads of TVs that are listed as 120Hz that can take up to 60Hz input but can output up to 120 Hz using interpolation.  This is by far the most common scenario when you see a "120" in a TV description.

 

2. Yes, there are TVs that can receive and display 120Hz.  They are usually not advertised as such.  120 Hz feeds are usually only from PCs.  You have to be careful though because many of them will take a 120Hz feed, show something like 1080p120 in the corner, and yet actually discard frames.  You have to run a special utility to see if this is happening.  My TV (Sony KDL-60R550A) will do just this and if I want to actually receive and display 120 frames per second, I have to drop the resolution down to 720p.  Again, this is for special connections (usually PCs) and almost always for gaming.

 

3. Yes, there are numbers that sound like refresh rate that are actually pulsing mechanisms on top of refresh rate.  Most mid to higher end TVs these days combine two techniques together.  Usually the Hz rating will be the number of frames it can output (long story there), and other ratings (such as Sony's MotionFlow) will be that multiplied by a number of flashes for blur mitigation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, this is interesting.


So, outside of connecting to a PC, when viewing HD material either from digital broadcast, cable, streaming from Netflix, or even Blue Ray DVD, the actual refresh rate delivered is never more than 60 Hz? All these various methods of obtaining "effective" 120hz are enhancements to 60HZ.


Is there a thread anywhere that discusses the various120hz enhancement methods of different brands and compares them?


I get the feeling maybe I'm in the wrong sub forum, yes?
 
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