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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Home theater is up & running! My kids love the star ceiling & like to leave it on while we watch movies. One problem: the twinkle wheel is louder than my projector!


The star ceiling light source & twinkel wheel is mounted above my drywall ceiling.


Any thoughts would be appreciated.


Mike
 

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I suppose there are many things that could be done.


The things which first come to mind:


1. The hole through the ceiling is an obvious path for sound to reach the room. See if there is any way to make the hold smaller, or to make it harder for sound to leak through. Can you use felt washers or insulation to block the hole?


2. Try to isolate the motor from the supports which hold the drywall ceiling.


At minimum try using rubber washers between the screws/nails that hold the motor and whatever it is attached too. The more you can isoloate the motor from the ceiling, the better. It would be better to have the motor suspended from a plywood sheet. Then have that plywood sheet resting on thick layers of felt or rubber on top of brackets. The idea is to avoid direct contact between the motor and any brackets or supports. Use weight on the plywood sheet to dampen vibrations.


3. Try using a quieter motor. This is probably the simplest and most direct solution. Look for a motor with magnetic or fluid bearings which reduce friction and minimize vibrations. Or at least get a motor with ball-bearings.


4. Try putting more sound absorbing materials around the motor and the cieling. Look into something like Acoustiblok. It has a good STC rating and is fairly thin. Be careful not to overheat the motor by smothering it in insulation.


5. Don't use the motor while watching movies.
 

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I didn't think that was too easy. I wanted to drywall my basement ceilings, but really wanted the star system. I was ready to face reality and use the drop ceiling panels, but I saw your post. Can you post some pic's and some basic instructions on how you did it? Did you do your whole ceiling or just a small star field?


Thanks


Kreepn
 

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I just thought of another idea.


Put the twinkle wheel further away, probably in another room. Run fiber optic cables from it to the ceiling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the idea's. It is not practical to move the light souse now but I can easily isolate it from the ceiling joist or even hang a platform from the roof rafters to isolate the vibration from the ceiling.


Again, thank for all the idea's. This forum is awesome.


For Krepn: the star ceiling is awesome. It took some long hours in a hot attic this summer but the result is worth it. People can not believe how good it looks. Neighbors just stare & ask how it works.


The link above to the fiber optic store is where I got all my information & supplies. With further questions you can call Paul there or send me an e-mail.


I would post a pic but the digital camera that I bought MY WIFE for Christmas is all wrapped up. Could post a pic after 12-25....


Good luck with the project.


Mike
 

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How about using an LED-driver instead of the noisy, fan-cooled halogen driver. Are the LED drivers less lumens or something? From my experience, the high-intensity LEDs on my Custom-made PC case are too bright to look at straight-on sometimes. I'm sure you could work an LED driver so that it didn't need to be battery-driven and could plug into the wall outlet (or hard-wired to a switch as it may be in your case). I have no idea about what your setup is like, but you could even use a flourescent tube to do the illuminating like this:

http://www.thefiberopticstore.com/Pr...ge-light02.jpg


...just some thoughts.


Look forward to seeing some pics after Xmas!


-THEO-
 

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OH Wait!


I get it now, it's the little motor that turns the twinkle wheel that's making the noise. I was either thinking about it way too much or way too little.


Anyway, the best way to isolate vibrations might be with those sharp, pointy, metal feet that good speakers and component stands come with, or to actually suspend the unit from above. The main idea is to reduce the amount of contact surface area between the unit and the ceiling or wall.


Back when I used to DJ professionally, the club I was resident at had the turntables on a platform of plywood that was suspended by huge, industrial-strength steel chains. If we didn't do that, the bass from the subwoofers would have caused a feedback loop with the stylus of the turntable. It's sort of like a bass feedback loop when a normal microphone gets too close to the speaker, but it makes a low-low bass frequency instead of a high-pitched squeel. It's a very efficient way to blow your sub drivers! :p The only other effective way for isolating turntables from speaker vibrations (in a pro-sound setting) was to place the turntables on top of stacks of cinder blocks.


The other kind of noise that may be audible is being transferred through the air itself. In this case, your light driver could be levitating with anti-gravity supports, and you could still hear it. If this is the case, then you probably want to look into some acoustic insullation (foam, fiberglass, etc.) to absorb or redirect the sound waves moving through the air as well. That is of course unless maintaing an airless vacuum inside your attic isn't a problem... :p


Good luck!


-THEO-
 

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Mike,


What kind of illuminator are you using? I am using the SuperVision SV-750 and the twinkle wheel makes almost no noise. Unfortunately the same can not be said for the fan which cools the bulb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm using the SV-750 also. I checked which is making the noise. I shut the wheel motor off & found the noise is actually from the fan.


I still plan to suspend the unit from above & put some dense insulation below it. The fiberglass does not seem to stop the sound.


Mike
 

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I wonder why they don't just use flourescent bulbs inside the illuminator. You know? ....like this small, screw-in kind that fit in "normal" light fixtures. I mean, I guess that the Halogen has more lumen output (?) but the silent running might be better for some than a the increased brightness a halogen can provide... I don't know... just rambling... maybe it wouldn't work...


-THEO-
 
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