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I followed a thread (that is now 9 months old) discussing the lack of 1080P 120Hz projectors (2D). I was wondering if anyone knows of any new projectors out there that can take 1080P at 120Hz. I'm using the BenQ W1070 and the motion blur/choppy refresh is really annoying/headachey during gameplay (I'm guessing it's 60Hz).

If no 1080P 120Hz projectors exist in the consumer market, what would be a major upgrade in the motion blur department? I'm an electrical engineer, so I wouldn't mind doing some hacking to achieve my goal.

I'm not interested in 3D at all, but I would love to upgrade to a 1080P 120Hz projector, or something with some sort of interpolation.

On another note, are there any 2560x1600 or 1920x1200 projectors at the consumer level that have decent contrast?
 

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You're using a DLP projector which has (by far) better motion resolution than any LCD-type display on the market. There is no "added" blur on visible level with a DLP projector. Native grey to grey response times of DLP DMDs are 16 microseconds, compare that to a good LCD at around 2 milliseconds and that equates to 25 times faster. As far as 1080p native projectors go you're stuck at 60hz input. This is due to input board and video processing choices by the manufacturer. There are a few 2560 x 1600 DLP projectors out there that net somewhere around 3000:1 native contrast but they're expensive. Digital Projections and ProjectionDesign have models at this resolution.
 

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There is no "added" blur on visible level with a DLP projector. Native grey to grey response times of DLP DMDs are 16 microseconds, compare that to a good LCD at around 2 milliseconds and that equates to 25 times faster.
I have to respectfully disagree about what you're implying here. Theoretical 16 microseconds of native GTG response time (let it be the number you said) doesn't mean you get that much faster overall response in practice. Because, as you know, DLP is a 1-bit display and uses dithering to produce color unlike LCD. It offsets blur to bit-depth. In a given amount of time a designer has to choose between actual bit-depth and actual response time. In practice DLPs do suffer from motion blur which is deliberately there for the sake of increased effective bit-depth. The best performer in terms of motion resolution among the DLPs I saw is the Planar PD8150 that I now own. It almost has 1080 lines of motion resolution (as seen on one horizontal panning test) but not to the level of my CRT monitor (which is said to have 1ms of motion resolution). Other DLPs I've seen are not as stellar and produce around 480 lines (BenQ W7000 or Sharp XV-Z30000, for example).
 

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I didn't mean to imply that was what you were actually getting on screen. This is it's potential performance. Depending on how you're implementing color will change things up like you said. It was more to point out that it's much better than any LCD-variant digital front projection technology currently on the market. The Marantz VP-15S1 is a little better in terms of motion resolution. I was effectively seeing 1080 lines. The Planar couldn't quite hit this, but with regular content it was difficult to discern a difference in motion resolution between the two. Most LCD/LCoS can only do about 300-400 lines of resolution natively (without frame interpolation).
 
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