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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I have some stuttering problem while playing BD's from my NAS and if you too play from a NAS then maybe you can help me.

A few facts:

- my HTPC runs Vista 32bit

- Before the NAS came my HTPC read the BD's from local HDDs (from folders and/or ISOs). Playback was fluid.

- Nothing has changed in my HTPC before and after the NAS except that 1) there are 5 disks less in it and 2) I have disabled my sidebar as advised.

- My IO tests to my NAS from the HTPC gives an average of 9~10Mbytes/s in read and write mode, which is supposedly more than enough for BD's.


So if you successfully and fluidly read BD's from a NAS please share your experience with me, I might get a lead to a solution.


Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15531132


What's your network? How's the NAS connected to the PC?

Here we go, see the attached screenshot.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips /forum/post/15531333


Here we go, see the attached screenshot.

I don't think that will be enough bandwidth.

I have a Dlink 323 and plays very nice, as long as i disable the Bitorent application, make sure you have no other application running like backups and syncs.

Mine connected to router and all pc's are connected at 1000mb,

the only flaw seems to be streaming blueray to the laptop (G only), may need to update the laptop to "n".
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonytoronto /forum/post/15531726


I don't think that will be enough bandwidth.

I have a Dlink 323 and plays very nice, as long as i disable the Bitorent application, make sure you have no other application running like backups and syncs.

Mine connected to router and all pc's are connected at 1000mb,

the only flaw seems to be streaming blueray to the laptop (G only), may need to update the laptop to "n".

Interesting!

FYI, the laptop is not used for streams at all. Only to manage downloads from the HTPC through an RDP session.

I have tested the reading while the LAN was idle. No downloads or copy or any other activity.

Now could you explain why do you think that a tested throughput of 9Mbytes/s between the HTPC and the NAS is not enough to read a BD?

I mean the BD bitstream is averaging the 20Kb/s, right?

It should be more than enough.

Correct me if I am wrong.


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips /forum/post/15531824


Interesting!

FYI, the laptop is not used for streams at all. Only to manage downloads from the HTPC through an RDP session.

I have tested the reading while the LAN was idle. No downloads or copy or any other activity.

Now could you explain why do you think that a tested throughput of 9Mbytes/s between the HTPC and the NAS is not enough to read a BD?

Usually issues like that are because the throughput is not stable enough. Small interruptions can cause glitches.

Quote:
I mean the BD bitstream is averaging the 20Kb/s, right?

More like 20-50Mbps, which is 3-6MB/sec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15532053


Usually issues like that are because the throughput is not stable enough. Small interruptions can cause glitches.




More like 20-50Mbps, which is 3-6MB/sec.

Oooook! This is better.

So if i need 3~6MB/s throughput and have around 9 available it could be that if the stream is not stable it is the reason why I experience these glitches.

What is left to do now is to determine either:

- how to improve the steadiness of the stream, or

- to finalize the problem by changing my second router to a 1Gb speed router to have headroom


But then how would this second router behave when connected to the ADSL router?

I mean the ADSL router is the only router in charge. So if a 1Gb router is connected to the ADSL as a hub, will I get a 1Gb speed between the HTPC and the NAS? I foresee many complications about the network speed.

I think that if any part/element of my LAN works at 1Gb speed than all component must be upgraded to 1Gb, right?

Well that's an investment I might consider only if I am sure this will solve my problem.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips /forum/post/15532211


Oooook! This is better.

So if i need 3~6MB/s throughput and have around 9 available it could be that if the stream is not stable it is the reason why I experience these glitches.

Yes, exactly, we see this all the time with wireless connections. Despite being "connected" at 54Mbps, and having "sustained" throughput of maybe 30Mbps, people have trouble with OTA (12-20Mbps) because the connection is not stable enough.

Quote:
What is left to do now is to determine either:

- how to improve the steadiness of the stream, or

- to finalize the problem by changing my second router to a 1Gb speed router to have headroom

Do you have a Switch or a Hub? And why two routers? I'd probably just hang a gig-e switch of the DSL router and connect everything to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15532608


Yes, exactly, we see this all the time with wireless connections. Despite being "connected" at 54Mbps, and having "sustained" throughput of maybe 30Mbps, people have trouble with OTA (12-20Mbps) because the connection is not stable enough.




Do you have a Switch or a Hub? And why two routers? I'd probably just hang a gig-e switch of the DSL router and connect everything to that.

So you give the example of wireless connections. But I am connected via wired connection which is twize the speed. Do you still think it is not enough?


About the switch what do you think of that:

- in order to minimize the costs I can upgrade the secondary router to 1 Gb

- set the HTPC and the NAS to work at 1 Gb under a separate LAN

- connect the ADSL router (100Mbps) to the WAN port of the secondary router (secondary LAN)

The result would be a separate 1Gb LAN for the NAS and HTPC connected to the other 100Mb LAN from which it will get to the internet.

The only problem I would have left would be to establish a full routing between the 2 LANs to be able to access my HTPC and NAS from my laptop.

(FYI, my laptop and ADSL router are on 3rd floor while my HTPC and NAS are in the basement)


Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15533445


You don't need a separate LAN, just a switch.

A switch? Did you have a look at the attached file a few posts earlier?

Where would you put it?

As I said the ADSL router and other PCs are connected together on the 3rd floor while an ethernet cable goes from the ADSL router to the basement and connects to the hub that connects the HTPC and the NAS.

So where do you put the switch exactly?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips /forum/post/15533625


A switch? Did you have a look at the attached file a few posts earlier?

Where would you put it?

As I said the ADSL router and other PCs are connected together on the 3rd floor while an ethernet cable goes from the ADSL router to the basement and connects to the hub that connects the HTPC and the NAS.

So where do you put the switch exactly?

You would replace your second router in the basement. with a switch, look at Dlink for the new green series 4 or 8 port. This switch is plug and play (unmaned) there are no settings of any sort. You would than have your router for internet access and network control.. I setup out network at work that way and works great. Im in the process of making my new home theater and already have 8 port for the basement.. My setup is identical to yours, other than router and modem are 1st floor. I have all cat6 wire already in place, but till now cat5 didn't seem to make any diference.

hxxp:// www.dlink.ca/corporate/environment/dlink-green-ethernet/
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonytoronto /forum/post/15533872


You would replace your second router in the basement. with a switch, look at Dlink for the new green series 4 or 8 port. This switch is plug and play (unmaned) there are no settings of any sort. You would than have your router for internet access and network control.. I setup out network at work that way and works great. Im in the process of making my new home theater and already have 8 port for the basement.. My setup is identical to yours, other than router and modem are 1st floor. I have all cat6 wire already in place, but till now cat5 didn't seem to make any diference.

hxxp:// www.dlink.ca/corporate/environment/dlink-green-ethernet/

Well, you seem to be knowledgeable so I thought I might squeeze a bit more from you.

How would you add wi-fi coverage in the basement then?

Are there any wi-fi switches?

Or maybe i could just connect my secondary wi-fi router to one of the switches' ports?

I need answers because tomorrow I am going to buy all i need for the solution. I want these glitches to be over and behind me already.


Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtrips /forum/post/15534378


Well, you seem to be knowledgeable so I thought I might squeeze a bit more from you.

How would you add wi-fi coverage in the basement then?

Are there any wi-fi switches?

Or maybe i could just connect my secondary wi-fi router to one of the switches' ports?

I need answers because tomorrow I am going to buy all i need for the solution. I want these glitches to be over and behind me already.


Thanks

in your diagram you show your ADSL as being wireless? Does this not cover your basement?


Here is what you'd like to do...

Connect your ADSL to a Wireless Gigabit router 802.11N/G/B (example: http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satel...=4086933028B05 )

Put a unmanaged gigabit switch in your basement and connec it to the router (example: http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satel...=7401833028B56 ) via wired network.


If you wireless won't cover the basement from your router location, then you might need to purchase a range expander (expample: http://www.linksys.com/servlet/Satel...=7813845678B42 ) or something simular to extend the Wireless range to the basement. My suggestion would be to put the Wireless router on a middle floor and it should cover the top floor and basement... unless you just have a huge house.


My experience is that Wireless is not reliable enough for HiDef video. I don't think 54 Megabit wireless is stable enough over any normal distance to do HiDef. 100 Megabit wired is just fine for HDvideo, but any lower is pushing it (or if you start pushing multiple streams or data). 1000 Megabit (Gigabit) is prefered.


From your diagram, you show that your using 100 Megabit wired connection which should be just fine. HD would only need 20 to 50 Megabit; however, from your testing you're getting 72 Megabit (which should still be plenty on a wired connection). - I converted your bytes to bits as it much easier to talk about if we use the same scheme. 8bits to a byte. 9MB=72mb.


Since you know your CPU can handle the load and the only other thing to change is to move it remotely to a NAS, I would recommend upgrading to Gigabit and see if that helps out, but I'd keep the reciepts incase it doesn't help out. Also you might want to check your cable connection from your ADSL to HUB to make sure it's not run next to a powerline or something giving interference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davisjl /forum/post/15534713


in your diagram you show your ADSL as being wireless? Does this not cover your basement?

No. Two concrete platforms separate the 3rd floor from the basement.

No coverage there.

But I have a CAT5 wire running from the ADSL router to the basement and all it is used for is internet and RDP connections.
 

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You'd want to get a Wireless Access Point and attach it to the switch in the basement. The most important thing is you don't want a hub down there. Hubs send everything to every port, and their performance is reduced to the lowest connection connected.


On the other hand a switch, everything is point to point, so you can have 10/100 and gig-e connected devices, and gig devices will be able to communicate at gig, while the slower ones will use the slower speed. But also, communication from other devices won't "contaminate" your connection between your HTPC and NAS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15534906


You'd want to get a Wireless Access Point and attach it to the switch in the basement. The most important thing is you don't want a hub down there. Hubs send everything to every port, and their performance is reduced to the lowest connection connected.


On the other hand a switch, everything is point to point, so you can have 10/100 and gig-e connected devices, and gig devices will be able to communicate at gig, while the slower ones will use the slower speed. But also, communication from other devices won't "contaminate" your connection between your HTPC and NAS.

Hello,


Ok. So now I have a 1GB switch in the basement and have raised the max frame size for TCP packets to 9216 in my Vista based HTPC and also enabled jumbo frames in the NAS.

Testing with IOmeter showed a serious improvement and trying to copy a file from and to the NAS was really quick.

Everything shows that these 2 are now connected at 1GB.

And still when i tried to play a BD it had glitches.

I don't know what else to look for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15551963


Does the PC play BDs fine from a local drive?

Well, as I said nothing in this PC changed except that all the drives have been removed and only a small one has been left to run Vista and the programs.

And before that, when the BDs were read from local all was smooth.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/15534906


You'd want to get a Wireless Access Point and attach it to the switch in the basement. The most important thing is you don't want a hub down there. Hubs send everything to every port, and their performance is reduced to the lowest connection connected.


On the other hand a switch, everything is point to point, so you can have 10/100 and gig-e connected devices, and gig devices will be able to communicate at gig, while the slower ones will use the slower speed. But also, communication from other devices won't "contaminate" your connection between your HTPC and NAS.

Agreed.. good info.

Something to keep in mind, that have been some reports some switches will reduce comm. to lowest speed connected, you connected at 1Gb and it shows, but won't go over 100mb.. i have yet to see the Dlink do this, but some say it does, so do other brands.. Now, obviously wiring and equipment connected may have something to do with it, like i said i haven't seen it.
 
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