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I am particulary interested in the Ohm dipole speakers for surrounds. I was thinking of trying these out as they have a 4 month trial period.
 

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My dad has had two pairs of the Ohm Walsh speakers. Pretty rare these days but he loves 'em.
 

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I'm not sure you could call them just "dipoles". I believe those speakers had a really neat dynamic driver that was like the normal cone, but it was stretched and faced up so that it basically radiated 360 degrees. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that how they worked? Beats Bose all to heck in terms of direct/reflecting ;) I think they also made more conventional speakers, but those weird technology ones would be really interesting to listen to. I wonder if they are still around?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by cpc
I'm not sure you could call them just "dipoles". I believe those speakers had a really neat dynamic driver that was like the normal cone, but it was stretched and faced up so that it basically radiated 360 degrees. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that how they worked? Beats Bose all to heck in terms of direct/reflecting ;) I think they also made more conventional speakers, but those weird technology ones would be really interesting to listen to. I wonder if they are still around?
cpc,


Correct you are - it would be incorrect to call the Walsh drivers of an Ohm speaker a dipole. A dipole has a particular

radiation pattern - two lobes or poles [ the prefix "di" means 2 ], that radiate forward and backward with little

radiation to the side. The front lobe and back lobe are of opposite phase. The bipole is similar, but with the 2 lobes

in phase.


The Ohm Walsh driver is actually the antithesis, or opposite of a dipole - it's an isotropic radiator [ at least in the horizontal plane ].


The Walsh drivers started with the Ohm Model A, continued with the Ohm F, and a series of smaller models. They are

still available, and in fact, their website indicates they have a new smaller model; Ohm Walsh SAT:

http://www.ohmspeakers.com/


I had a pair of Ohm H speakers that I got in grad school, and used in my theater until I retired them a few years ago.

I still plan on setting them up as my computer speakers.


However, for my critical listening and theater - they've been supplanted by dipoles.


Dr. Gregory Greenman

Physicist
 

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OH. I love unique stuff though. Thats why I perked up. So individual, purposeful and neat design. I guess the weird ones are kinda pricy. I'd love to hear what they sound like :)
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by saxguy
I was specifically talkin about these - the Ohm SAT DiPole REAR (scroll down page):

http://www.surroundspeakers.com/cgi-...ml?E+aa0003320
saxguy,


Sorry - I thought you were referring to one of the speakers in the Walsh series - with the Walsh driver.


I see that Ohm now has satellite speaker systems for HT applications - and one member of this class is a dipole.


Evidently these small "monolith"-looking speakers have drivers on both front and back surfaces that are wired

out of phase to give a true dipole.


Dr. Gregory Greenman

Physicist
 
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