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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I set out to look for something really simple (I thought). I'd like a monitor for watching composite sources (e.g. VCR), and progressive video sources (e.g. DVD). Only I don't want anything big. 20" would be fine, 25" is big, 27" is huge.


Does such a monitor exist? Is there a reasonably priced HD studio monitor (either 4:3 or 16:9)? What keeps smaller HD sets off the market?


-Bryce :confused:


PS: I don't care about TV, I don't care about HDTV. I'd listen using real speakers, so I don't care about audio either.


I like good video, and hate to see perfectly good scan lines (e.g. animorphic discs) put to waste. I'd be perfectly happen to repurpose a VGA computer monitor, but I get the sense that's not very practical (partially because DVD players are not allowed to have RGB outputs).
 

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I have a HTPC with a capture card and HiPix HDTV card

and I watch Laserdisk video (via dScaler & capture card),

DVDs (via software DVD players), and HDTV (via

the HiPix card) all to a 24" 16:9 Sony W900 monitor.


It works great, and has a picture that is better

than most "real" HDTVs. The 24" size is small

compared to the "real" 40"+ big screens, but

I was space limited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply:


The transcoders don't allow me to watch standard definition composite video (e.g. VCR).


I've already got a computer and wonderful flatpanel screen (the awesome SGI http://www.sgi.com/products/legacy/displays.html ). The software DVD is fine, but the captured composite video from the VCR is unacceptable. I'm using a Hauppauge brooktree card.


The available models of Priceton monitors don't include component video input. And as we know the [email protected]#[email protected] movie industry won't allow DVD players to have RGB output.


---------


So I'm still looking: A monitor with composite + progressive scan component video input, in a 27" or smaller package.


-Bryce :(
 

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brycen:


"I've already got a computer and wonderful flatpanel screen"


Just buy an IScan Pro (V2) line doubler ~ $600 for your composite (analog) sources. Run your audio thru a receiver.


Rich B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I tried that. The iScan plus (even the V2) can't pass through a progressive scan input.


So it violates need #2 (DVD at 480p). It would work dandy for need #1 (VCR playback).


Close as I can get:

VCR-->iScan doubler------>RGB--\\__switchbox-->VGA monitor

Progressive DVD-->9A62--->RGB--/


As I said, it seemed like a simple request.
 

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Maybe I'm missing something, but since the iScan's purpose is to make interlaced sources progressive, don't worry about passing progressive signals in from the DVD player. Just connect an interlaced DVD player (or progressive one in interlaced mode) up to the iScan with S-video ( or component if you got the iScan Pro). And still run composite in from the VCR. Then set it to RGB mode as you said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You mean take a progressive source (DVD), let the DVD player convert it to interlace, then scan double it back to progressive, and display it? No thanks.


I'm looking for true progressive scan directly out of the DVD player, with no scan doubling artifacts.
 

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Actually, DVDs are not a progressive source, at least not in the sense you might expect. Please take a look at this link:

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...e-10-2000.html


Especially see the sections on how the images on DVDs are stored.


The only extra A/D/A conversion you will have is the one in the iScan. It does cost you 3-4 lines of resolution, but I doubt you are going to be able to tell the difference, especially on a 20" computer monitor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Homm, very interesting. So many layers of BS in this industry. Thanks.


Maybe my goal should be to recover the extra scan lines in an anamorphic disc, with vertical compression. That definitely makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Those are still 29" monitors, way too big. Computer monitors, and european monitors come in smaller sizes (e.g. 19"-24"). I get the impression that nobody thinks there is a market for smaller sets in the USA.


And, widescreen standard definition sets seem to have disappeared also...
 

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I have 2 JVC HV-M260u professional 26" HD monitors that I use for displays in my kid's rooms. They are discontinued and only accept 1080i, but are broadcast monitors and look great.
 

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I own the Sony GDM-FW900 which is one step higher than the model you've linked. Its a 16:10, 24" monitor but with only 22.5" viewable screen real estate. I spent $1600 for it and running it at 1900x1200 with a geforce card is working flawlessly. The frame rate drops now and then during heavy gameplay but thats about it. The picture is superb and the flat face with the silver/grey bezel just adds that "cool" factor. The GDM-W900 isnt flat screen and its maximum rez is 1900 x 1200, whereas my monitor is flat screen and has a higher max rez but my video card cant support it so this shouldnt be an issue. If you dont care about the stylish bezel and flat screen face, I'm sure you can find a discounted W900 for around $1K with some searching. Considering the similarities between these two monitors and your needs, I would highly recommend getting one.


Best regards


Kia
 

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I don't see why you would even want it. DVD's don't really look that much better in progressive mode on such a small monitor. Also VHS and Regular TV will look worse. Just get a regular TV and be happy with it. It will save you a lot of monay and the picture quality will not really be any worse.
 
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