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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is is mandatory to use a UPS with a projector. Maybe someone can pull the plug on their unit after it's nice and hot and see if the bulb explodes! NOT! I can't remember seeing anything about this topic anywhere. Please advise. Thanks, and don't try it yourself.
 

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Many folks do. I plan to build a gigantic UPS system just for providing power to my home theater. OK, it's really a solar and wind power system for the house we are designing that will hopefully get us off the grid, but it will have a very large array of batteries and a power inverter.



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"Not a bad idea, but make sure you use one that produces true sine wave A/C output"

You're right Mark. In my country we have black out in the electrical systems almost every day, and yes we use UPS with all the home theater equipment but the must be sine wave output. One time I had problem with an X10 light control that I plugged to an UPS with square wave output b/c the power supply inside the X10 takes the 110 AC input and "filter" it to 12 AC input, for that input must be sine wave.

If you find any place where to get sine output UPS on the net please let us know.

Federico
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking of an APS (American Power Conversion) model APC BackUPS 650. We have them here at work, but I don't know how clean they are. I'll try to look at the output on a scope and see.

My reason to use this is I don't want to pay over $700 Cdn. to buy a new bulb if the power fails and the bulb overheats,etc.


Tyee
 

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I have the Back-Ups 650 for my PC, it does NOT output a pure sinewave. I believe the "Smart-UPS" series have a sine-wave output. The APC site will state this in the specs for whatever model you're considering.
 

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If I'm not mistaken, and I'm not http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif , only the SmartUPS and better have true sinewave output. That means, no BackUPS Pro for you.


I personally just use APC Line-R (line-conditioner) for the projector. I do have a SmartUPS powering other stuff, but I don't feel it's necessary to watch movie when power goes out. I can still run external fan of the hushbox to cool it slowly if power does go out.


On a different note, I calculated what it would take to watch a 2 hour movie. It turns out to be around $5000 worth of Matrix UPS with extended run time.
 

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I think that this post has quite a bit of confusing advice. It seems that many posters want to run their entire HT off a UPS, so you can watch movies if the power goes out. Others, like me, just want a UPS for thier projector to protect the unit from overheating if there is a power failure.


Based on the original post it appears that tyee is more interested in the latter.


I think it a very good idea to have a UPS if your projector normally runs a fan for cooling after the bulb goes out.


FOR PROJECTOR SAFETY: You don't need a pure sine wave UPS because your only interested in keeping the fan going to cool your unit. If the power goes you would immediately shut down the projector and have the UPS keep the fan running for the normal shut down time. For my system that's about 90 seconds. This means that in most cases the UPS has to supply power for only a few minutes and you don't need a monster unit to do this.


TO RUN YOUR HT: Now having a pure sine wave is an issue and furthermore you'll need backups for your power amp, processor, etc. This is a very extensive undertaking when you consider the power requirement for you entire HT plus the fact that you'll need to run it for an extended amount of time.


John Moschella
 

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Quote:
On a different note, I calculated what it would take to watch a 2 hour movie. It turns out to be around $5000 worth of Matrix UPS with extended run time.
Some times ya just gotta do what ya gotta do. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


I believe that there are two types of UPSs. One type, the outlets are powered from a battery and the inverter must provide a true sine wave. The other type passes the conditioned line power through and switches to the battery when a fault occurs. Here too, the projector, etc. would be run for a (short) time while one scrambles to shut it down. I would definitely want one that outputs a true sine wave.



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The button is labeled "Play", not "Pay". STOP the MPAA!

Our Silent Angels

Please visit The Manny Page!


[This message has been edited by Man E (edited 06-08-2001).]
 

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John,


If the power fails, I believe that one would want the

fan inside the projector to run in addition to whatever

fan is used to cool the hushbox.


Additionally, some people use the current draw by the

projector to control the hushbox fan via the Sears

current-sensing switch that is oft discussed here.


Therefore, one needs to supply the projector itself with

UPS power. Since the projector is loaded with electronics;

some of which may require sine-wave power - I believe the

safest bet is to use a UPS with sine-wave output sized to

power both projector and hushbox fan.


Greg
 

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I plan on making a solar panel and battery powered system (with capacitance) that will power up and replace the DC power rails on my Amplifier, CD player, and pre-amp. A complete solar powered stereo. But.. then again, few out there have ever heard such a thing.


How about the Crazy audiphile who bought a lighthouse? Crazy like a fox. The basement of the entire lighthouse was a giagantic sunken battery system. It was designed to power the lighthouse for a very, very long time in the event of power failure. He turned the whole thing into a power system for his stereo. Not too shabby, eh?


I also happen toknow this guy who dsigns and executes UPS units for corporations, hospitals, gov. offices, etc. He can get some pretty freaky stuff. i might ask him about 'used pulls' when they go into do new installs. maybe I can get a battery powered 5-10kva true sine unit or sumpthin'.(maybe with a 2 cyl. diesel stuck on the side of it for good measure...)

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Ken Hotte

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[This message has been edited by KBK (edited 06-08-2001).]
 

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Not a bad idea, but make sure you use one that produces true sine wave A/C output. Many of the cheaper UPS models put out a "stepped sine wave" that could cause problems.
 

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Here's my $0.02

I have asked the same question in the forum about 6 months ago. I have a Dila projector. Most of the people who answered the question think that there should be no problem with a power outage when the projector in on. The reason is that in the field where Dila is used for trade shows, demos, and computer graphics presentations, the common method of turning off the projector is pulling the plug.

I have a SmartUPS 900 and did not find any difference in picture quality with or without the SmartUPS suppling power to the projector. Also the UPS is annoying because everytime I turn on a device that has a high power draw, like a PS 300 or a poweramp, there is beeping warning for 10 seconds. I also found that the Versalab woodblock provides better picture quality than the SmartUPS.

The PS audio Ultimate Outlet IMO makes the biggest differnce when the projector is plugged into it. It makes the picture looks more 3-D, especially in high contrast, i.e. black and white scenes.

Anyways, my Dila in a Whisperflow Hushbox is now plugged into the Ultimate Outlet. My HTPC and the transformer for the fans of the hushbox is plugged into the UPS.
 

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If you are going to spend alot of money to get great picture and sound, and all sorts of seats and popcorn machines... WHy would you forget about the thing that runs your system.


Years ago the company i worked for started using UPS's on all our projectors. THis was a major undertaking as some of these projectors were quite large. A hughes JVC 220V 30 amp projector requires a pretty large UPS.


We noticed an IMMEDIATE benefit in image quality and stability.


Our power grid in North America is horrible. Yes we have power, but it fluctuates and is not clean. A good UPS can solve that.
 

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I would be concerned about ground loop problems if you do this.


I had the horizontal rolling bars problem for a while.


I then plugged the projector into a surge protector that was connected to the top half of an outlet. The rest of my equipment was connected to another surge protector that went to the bottom of the same outlet. The rolling bars improved, but they were still present.


I then plugged the projector into the surge protector that I used for the rest of my equipment and the rolling bars problem went away.


I would think that a UPS could cause even more troubles.


I'm not saying that a UPS is a bad idea, just that it may not be as simple as just plugging the projector into it.


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What I use is a Monster HTS 2000 strip for the video equiptment.

I keep this because it has worked without problem, does provide some benefits to the image, and the insurance against damamge is a very nice and valuable feature.


I have not tried a UPS, but am now experimenting with plugging the Monster into a lab grade power regulation device (puts out clean 115V, 60Hz Sine, <.2%THD) which is REALLY working! Image clarity, smoothness depth, colors, wow!


I want to keep experimenting for a bit before I start releasing the name in case it blows up or something.

But aside from fan noise (I keep mine in a spearate room), it is pretty amazing. I have really bad power in my apt though.


dg
 

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I bought an APC BackUPS Office 350 for my projector, figuring it could handle the current draw of my projector for the few moments it would take me to turn off the projector in the event of a failure, and then continue to power the fan. It doesn't seem to hurt the image...


Question is, how do I test whether or not it can actually handle the projector in the event of a power failure without risking my projector? The UPS says it can handle 225 watts, which is what the projector says it takes (2.2A, 100-120 VAC). I normally run it in eco-mode, so I figured this would be ok... any ideas?
 

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If you were to run your whole system off a bicycle powered generator, you could achieve a cardiovascular workout while watching. Of course, if you had a heart attack, your bulb might still explode from lack of cooldown.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by tyee:
Is is mandatory to use a UPS with a projector. Maybe someone can pull the plug on their unit after it's nice and hot and see if the bulb explodes! NOT! I can't remember seeing anything about this topic anywhere. Please advise. Thanks, and don't try it yourself.
As noted, there was an old thread on this subject which ended with the fact that the lamp temperature could not get any higher with no power than it was just before the power went off... If your fan fails, that is another issue, but a UPS cannot solve that.

 

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Just did a search and couldn't find the old thread, so I haven't seen the argument...


My problem believing this argument is that individual elements certainly can get hotter..

As a thought experiment, let's say you have two pieces, a glass surface and a hot wire, separated by a small distance. Let's say the wire is at 1000 degrees, but the glass shatters at 900 degrees. So you have a fan blow air over it and the glass surface temperature never exceeds 900 degrees. When the power goes out, the wire slowly starts to cool from 1000 degrees down to room temp, but since the fan isn't going, the temperature of the air between the wire and the glass will rise to the wire temp, causing the temperature at the glass surface to exceed 900 degrees. As a result, the glass shatters.


Does anybody have any real data/experience with this, especially in an enclosed environment without natural air circulation (ie. a small theater room or hushbox)?
 
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