AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,995 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With the low cost of unit kits from Netgear that include 4 port switches, this approach seems like a no brainer over wireless, especially for an HT setup such as mine where there's an ATV2, BD player, TV with ethernet vignets and a network capable AVR. Users reviews seem to be very positive. For less than $130, what's the catch?..Sure beats pulling cat5e through the walls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/0


With the low cost of unit kits from Netgear that include 4 port switches, this approach seems like a no brainer over wireless, especially for an HT setup such as mine where there's an ATV2, BD player, TV with ethernet vignets and a network capable AVR. Users reviews seem to be very positive. For less than $130, what's the catch?..Sure beats pulling cat5e through the walls.

The catch is that almost all homes have two legs on their home wiring. The purpose of the two legs is to provide 220/240V to your a/c and dryer. problem is that the ethernet over power line devices dont like to send their signal between the two different legs. half of your outlets in your house will be on one leg, the other half on the other leg. if you happen to plug both of the netgear devices into outlets on the same leg then you can get very good speeds. if they are on different legs then lowly wireless g will give you better speeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/19592430


And there's no fix for this like with x-10 devices such as a simple bridge at the panel box?

I use a X10 dryer outlet bridge for my X10 signals. I have some of the older 85Mps power line adapters. The admin utility shows the adapters on the same leg getting the 85Mps speed, the off leg adapter is showing 14Mps.


I bought from Best Buy outlet one time a set of the AV (200Mps) adapters. The set came with a dryer outlet bridge. The off leg speed actually went down when I had the bridge in place, down to about 18Mps. I returned them My house is only 7 years old so I don't have old wiring.


I use my 85Mps set for a printer and for a blu-way player firmware updates. I don't use it for anything I want to stream, its just not up to the task, and neither was the 200Mps stuff. I bought a WNDR3700 router and stream MKV's to a WDTLive with Wireless N USB adapter with no issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13
Hard to believe that wirelessN is faster than powerline. Something doesn't sound right there. I know the house is new and wiring should be all copper but.......
Theoretical, and I stress theoretical. Wireless N top speed 300Mbps, Powerline 200Mbps


Right now according to Windows 7 Network Connection Status on my laptop which is on a different floor, about 50 feet away from the router it is showing a connection of 300Mbps Once again theoretical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,650 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/19593993


Hard to believe that wirelessN is faster than powerline. Something doesn't sound right there. I know the house is new and wiring should be all copper but.......

For my setup the powerline adapter was much more reliable than wireless N. I watch ripped DVDs and some "HD Lite" material recorded from Directv on an Apple TV running XBMC. The content is on a Linux NAS. With wireless N I would periodically get pauses and hickups. With the powerline adapters it works just as well as a hard wired connection.


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,995 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanx for the feedback guys. I'm pretty sure i have two paths to follow. One is to 'extend' my wireless N network with an extender on the far end of the first floor where the media room is...which if i understand correctly would require a hard wire connection to the extender, either via Cat5/6 or powerline. Running hard wire there just isn't feasable as i'd have to cut quite a few holes in the walls to drill through the firebreaks between the floors and then there's crossing the ceilings to the interior wall. There's no access from an outside facing wall...period. Now if i go with a powerline setup...say the netgear with the 4 port switch which is around $100 street price, not only do i get a more reliable connection than my current wireless, but i also get the added function of 3 more ports for other devices in the media room.


Here's my situation. My wireless router is located on the second floor at the PC. My main media setup is in a dedicated room on the first floor clear on the other side. I use my iTouch and remote app to control and stream iTunes to an airport express in the media space and two ATVs on the second floor......where everything works really well. But downstairs, it lags and the remote app freezes and has to reconnect from time to time. With the addition of streaming Pandora and music directly from my iTouch now via Airplay, it's just too far for the iTouch to stream the content back upstairs to the wireless router back down to the airport.


Either way, powerline or Moca seems the only solution. I'd add a wireless extender to that room for the iTouch ( and future iPad!..i hope) which would allow control of everything from the back yard as well....where i plan on adding another audio zone for parties and outdoor dining.


So, now tht everyone knows the situation, i welcome all suggestions before i buy anything. I'd really like to add a video streaming device to the media room such as another ATV or similiar device. The ATV would probobly be the better option as it has iTunes capability and my library of near 2TB of music is ripped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdb4133 /forum/post/0


I would recommend the Netgear WNHDE111 which is a 5Ghz Wireless-N based Ethernet Bridge. You can read my comments about it here: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...3#post19262513

I want to echo the the 3DHD 3004 product vote. When you need high speed bandwidth this is your best bet. The 4 port Powerline works great if your house can handle it. In my case I ave 2 homes. One has the Powerline and works great. It streams everything perfectly exct for bluray rips. The only solution was wire or the 3004. In my other house which is older and larger Powerline barely can pass a low res ip camera. The 3004 works everywhere. It s [email protected]$249 but if you need it's performance it's the only game in town. Also has 4 ports on board as well.


Bob Silver

Netgear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
My advice based on my experience would be to take a good hard look at finding a way to hardwire your home. I tried what seemed like every Wireless N router and bridge out there to connect my devices and nothing was capable of streaming blu-ray rips reliably. I also tried several powerline adapter kits and the results were similar (just slightly worse then the best wireless N solution).


So finally I decided that drilling a few holes was actually easier and less time consuming then all the different options and related testing I had tried. So to sum it up, if running a wired connection is possible skip all the other options and go straight to that, you won't regret it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
The new 500 mb powerline stuff is finally available, so really if you won't do wired I think that's gonna be the way to go for anyplace that doesn't have relatively antique wiring.


The few tests I've seen so far show real-world throughput more than sufficient for even the highest rate bluray rips, which you generally won't get out of wireless or the older 200mb powerline hardware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,221 Posts
I'm using Western Digital's Livewire and TiVo's last transfer to speed was 49.24 Mb/s - at times it's faster/slower. Not sure if TiVo or Livewire is the bottleneck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R /forum/post/19626715


I'm using Western Digital's Livewire and TiVo's last transfer to speed was 49.24 Mb/s - at times it's faster/slower. Not sure if TiVo or Livewire is the bottleneck.

The livewire is the bottleneck.


It's a 200mb system (for which 49.24 in real life is actually quite good)... the 500mb powerline systems should produce real-world speeds 2-2.5 times faster than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,221 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurtz9 /forum/post/19626788


It's a 200mb system (for which 49.24 in real life is actually quite good)... the 500mb powerline systems should produce real-world speeds 2-2.5 times faster than that.

I think I could do better as I don't even have them plugged directly into the wall. Hopefully the 500Mb will arrive before my return period. I semi-stole the Livewire for $79 so I'll pay a premium for the faster speed perhaps up to $150. Or perhaps I'll just pay the AV quote for $88 to convert the phone outlet to Cat5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,347 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurtz9 /forum/post/19626788


It's a 200mb system (for which 49.24 in real life is actually quite good)... the 500mb powerline systems should produce real-world speeds 2-2.5 times faster than that.

That specification of 200Mbps is actually a marketing fantasy -- and obviously quite deceptive. It's really no more than 100 Mbps each way. Because the adapters are full duplex, the marketers add the uplink+downlink to come up with 200Mbps. So read the fine print on the AV500 adapters. They are probably only 250Mbps each way.


I have a pair of the Netgear AV200's to go between my router and the switch on my entertainment center. I get a measured throughput of about 50 Mbps between my NAS and my current streamer. That is plenty to smoothly stream any full bitrate DVD.iso and TiVo.mpg recordings but not enough to stream full bitrate BD.iso without some stutter. The other limitation I see is with trick-play functions. DVD bitrates are rarely more than 8Mpbs at peak so there is plenty of headroom for FF/RW to work smoothly. The TiVo HD files max at about 17Mbps. There is not enough for FF/RW to work smoothly -- at least not with my player -- it makes trying to FF through commercials useless.


If the AV500's bring you up to at least 80-90 Mbps, you'll be OK to stream full bitrate BD.iso. Buy them from somewhere you can return them easily (like BB) so you can try them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,347 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R /forum/post/19626889


I semi-stole the Livewire for $79 so I'll pay a premium for the faster speed perhaps up to $150.

The AV500's are listed at $160 on the Netgear site. You can order direct from them. I have not found any retailers selling them yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,221 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson /forum/post/19627268


The AV500's are listed at $160 on the Netgear site. You can order direct from them. I have not found any retailers selling them yet.

One nice thing about the Livewire is that it has 4 ports on each adapter. This allowed me to place both units in the same room which helped with the speed. At least according to their speed test utility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
Are you trying to stream BD over the powerline? Can't comment on that, but our house just needs good conn for netflix and hulu plus to the roku hd in the bedroom, and our wifi was struggling to give even two bars on the stream on roku. Powerline solved it, solid 4 bars 'hd' now. Cheap n cheerful.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top