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That is the ATV's way of turn off CEC.
But it seems that this doesn't turn off CEC completely as volume control via CEC still worked. Although it's off by default on mine because it's unstable, I enabled it to see if it would still work. So "Control TVs and Recievers" seems to only disable most CEC features, but not CEC in general.

Volume control via CEC is only guaranteed to work one way down: from TV remote to the rest. Some brands implement bi-directional CEC volume control. Some don't. In my home, Vizio TVs won't let you do CEC volume control from streaming boxes. Samsung and Sharp TVs do support such.
But shouldn't every TV with CEC support be able to hand over volume control to an AVR? I have a Philips TV and a Denon AVR. When the AVR is on, the TV is set up to mute the internal speakers and hand over volume control to the AVR. So if it works, I can control AVR volume with the buttons of my TV, AVR and external devices like the ATV. But if it's not, it's just broken in general. Then the volume buttons on ATV do nothing and the ones one TV/AVR just adjust the device's volume. Then I have to turn CEC off on TV/AVR, power both devices off/on and enable CEC again to get it back working. So I stopped trying, disabled the TV speakers completely and now only control volume on my AVR over IR.
 

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I use CEC extensively and have for years. Aside from a cheap Insignia TV in a little-used location, it works pretty flawlessly. For instance, when my AT4K wakes up, my AVR and Sony TV power on as well. Guess I've just been lucky.
This is what CEC was designed for, and it often works extremely well for simple set-ups - single source, single display; which covers 99% of households.

In my family room 2 displays, 3 sources, full AVR audio, plus a sound bar) I don't know what I would do without my Harmony Elite. If I accidentally left CEC on for even one of those seven devices, it would cause chaos.

On the other hand, in my room with a TV, sound bar, and lone ATV source, I retired my Harmony long ago. CEC with the ATV remote is all I need.

For most people, it's a great feature. For many of us - with complex set-ups, it's often to be avoided if at all possible. It was never designed to serve us.

Pip
 

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But shouldn't every TV with CEC support be able to hand over volume control to an AVR? I have a Philips TV and a Denon AVR. When the AVR is on, the TV is set up to mute the internal speakers and hand over volume control to the AVR. So if it works, I can control AVR volume with the buttons of my TV, AVR and external devices like the ATV. But if it's not, it's just broken in general. Then the volume buttons on ATV do nothing and the ones one TV/AVR just adjust the device's volume. Then I have to turn CEC off on TV/AVR, power both devices off/on and enable CEC again to get it back working. So I stopped trying, disabled the TV speakers completely and now only control volume on my AVR over IR.
You missed the point. HDMI CEC remote control and volume control means you can use your TV's remote to control most common functionalities of AVR and attached devices from TV remote. It has nothing to do with muting internal speakers or not. CEC standard is not designed to let down stream devices like AVR or BD players (or ATV) to use their remote to control TV's functionality.
 

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You missed the point. HDMI CEC remote control and volume control means you can use your TV's remote to control most common functionalities of AVR and attached devices from TV remote. It has nothing to do with muting internal speakers or not. CEC standard is not designed to let down stream devices like AVR or BD players (or ATV) to use their remote to control TV's functionality.
My TV has 3 settings for the internal speakers: Always on, always off and Auto (using EasyLink). EasyLink is how Philips calls CEC. With "Auto" the TV decides if it should mute the internal speakers depending on if the AVR is on or off. And it seems that it's using CEC to detect that. But you are right that then it's actually the TV controlling the AVR's volume and not the other way around. So it's just the ATV that tries to do it in the other direction. So now I know why it's so unstable. (y)
 

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CEC might be OK if you just have a single device connected to a single TV but I have the ATV 4K fed into an AVR which feeds 2 different TVs plus a projector not to mention the 3 HD DVRs and the Blu-ray and occasionally I'll plug in the Roku Ultra or Fire stick and ... :whistle:
 
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This is what CEC was designed for, and it often works extremely well for simple set-ups - single source, single display; which covers 99% of households.

In my family room 2 displays, 3 sources, full AVR audio, plus a sound bar) I don't know what I would do without my Harmony Elite. If I accidentally left CEC on for even one of those seven devices, it would cause chaos.

On the other hand, in my room with a TV, sound bar, and lone ATV source, I retired my Harmony long ago. CEC with the ATV remote is all I need.

For most people, it's a great feature. For many of us - with complex set-ups, it's often to be avoided if at all possible. It was never designed to serve us.

Pip
Well, I don't have multiple displays in a single room, and I can see how that would complicate things, but I do have 5 sources plugged into my AVR. The only source that doesn't always correctly command the AVR to switch to its interface is the Roku Ultra, which tends to get about the same amount of use as the Blu-Ray player which means almost none, so it doesn't matter too much. Based on all the CEC hate in this thread, I do feel grateful it works as well as it does for me.
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
My AVR does the switching in part because I have 3 displays. :)
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
I prefer to use my receivers as the hub of my HTS's. I don't use ARC/CEC so my life is not as complicated as some.
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
AVR is prefered but sometimes it is not possible, e.g. HDMI 2.1, ALM, VRR and 4K 120Hz not necesary available on most AVRs. Ppl tend to hold on to their AVRs longer than TVs.
 

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AVR is prefered but sometimes it is not possible, e.g. HDMI 2.1, ALM, VRR and 4K 120Hz not necesary available on most AVRs. Ppl tend to hold on to their AVRs longer than TVs.
True. But if you're a non-gamer then the HDMI 2.1 options sets don't mean much at this point in time.
 

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I'd need a TV with 6-8 HDMI inputs so yeah...receiver.
 

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I'd use my TV, but it only has 2x UHD capable inputs compared to my AVR's 4. On my TV's with sound bars which only have a single source, I connect the sources directly to the TV, and output the audio via ARC to the sound bars.
 

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True. But if you're a non-gamer then the HDMI 2.1 options sets don't mean much at this point in time.
Console gaming are quite popular in home entertainment. Even if you don't game, you still need an AVR that can pass through DV which requires a quite recent AVR as well.

The problem with ARC is you never know if it will reliably work and a lot of unknow limitation from TV itself (like can't pass through DTS audios on many TVs).
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
Unless your TV and AVR have eArc this setup does not support audio formats that take a lot of bandwidth.

If you have an eArc on your TV and AVR it is actually a preferable setup IMHO because you can have different HDMI video settings per device which you cannot do if the video goes thru the AVR. But, and this is good and bad, you also don’t see you AVR’s volume control overlay on the TV and of course you can’t have device specific audio settings.
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
In my case I have an AVR that doesn’t support 4K HDR pass-through so I run the audio and video to the TV but in cases where a device provides dual HDMI outputs (like my UHD Blu-ray Player) I also run the audio to my AVR to enjoy all the high bandwidth formats as shown on my wiring diagram below.

The Samsung TV lineup offers a pretty slick GUI and Universal Remote setup and, as mentioned previously, running the devices to the TV allows me to maintain separate picture settings for each of them.

3076803
 

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Console gaming are quite popular in home entertainment. Even if you don't game, you still need an AVR that can pass through DV which requires a quite recent AVR as well.

The problem with ARC is you never know if it will reliably work and a lot of unknow limitation from TV itself (like can't pass through DTS audios on many TVs).
Agreed. That's why I use my receivers as the hub and not the tv. No ARC for me ;).
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
My display is a display. Sources go to receiver, which does the switching. Like it should be.
 

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This might not be the best place to ask, but do most of you prefer to plug everything into the TV and let it do the switching and sending of audio to an AVR or sound bar......or plug everything into an AVR and let it do the switching sending video to the TV?
I use my receiver as well for switching. My old receiver didn't support DV so I upgraded. With multiple source devices (ATV4K, PS5, UHD Disc Player, DirecTV box) it was an absolute nightmare to try and get CEC to play nice. Using my Yamaha RX-A3080 to do the switching makes my life simple and all devices do what they are supposed to. I also am able to process uncompressed audio when available.
 

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+1 on everything connected to my SSP. One simple HDMI connection from SSP to TV for video. Harmony to control everything...
 
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