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Are either the now available Samsung 3D or Panasonic 3D Tv's currently equipped with the new HDMI 1.4(a) which allows for both sequential and side-by-side 3D input? I see this standard was just adopted on or about March 4th so curious if either manufacturer had already incorporated 1.4(a) rather than the earlier 1.4 which only allows for sequential 3D input and not side-by-side. (Apparently to receive broadcast 3D will require 1.4(a)) Assuming the models now in inventory do not have the new 1.4(a) has anyone learned when the new standard will be incorporated into Samsung and Panasonic's 3D TVs? Specifically will the Panasonic 65 inch plasma 3D TV scheduled to be available in July have the newest HDMI 1.4(a) standard for sure?
 

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The Samsung C7000 series 3D HDTV accept side by side and other HDMI 1.4a content according to it's user manual. It appears that the TV manufacturers were implementing and testing HDMI 1.4 chips with manufacturing samples long before the spec was finalized.
 

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You are right to worry. All the new 3D TVs that were presented at the CES, and that are going on sale now (Panasonic, Samsung, LG, Sony...) adhere to HDMI 1.4 - without the 'a'.


HDMI 1.4a adds the requirement of the previously optional format side-by-side(half) in 1080i, and the completely new format top-and-bottom in 720p and 1080p24. The TV manufacturers have to adhere to these mandatory requirements within 90 days after the HDMI 1.4a spec was released, that would be 2010-06-02. Any TV sold (released? not sure..) before that date does not have to support SBS and TB, which could impact your interoprability with future 3D firmware updates of your sat or cable box.


So far there were no statements from any of the manufacturers, regarding future changes in their models, or firmware updated, to address this issue. Technically, they do not have to provide any of the HDMI 1.4a capabilities in sets sold before june.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by walford /forum/post/18299128


The Samsung C7000 series 3D HDTV accept side by side and other HDMI 1.4a content according to it's user manual. It appears that the TV manufacturers were implementing and testing HDMI 1.4 chips with manufacturing samples long before the spec was finalized.

Accoring to that manual, the TV acceps side-by-side(half) and top-bottom(half), which match the HDMI 1.4a formats, but does not do any of the HDMI 1.4a signalling. It (probably) does not announce support for SBS in the EDID, and certainly does not announce support for TB. This would require you to force such a mode on the player or set top box.


It also might not detect the HDMI 1.4a info frames, that accompany the SBS and TB signals, which requires you to manually switch to that input mode in the TV's menu.
 

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No product can yet claim to be HDMI 1.4a complient since the testing requirements have not yet been officially released by the HDMI organization.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones /forum/post/18300627


No product can yet claim to be HDMI 1.4a complient since the testing requirements have not yet been officially released by the HDMI organization.

The compliance test specification version 1.4a was released together with HDMI 1.4a, but the production cycles do not allow for HDMI 1.4a compliant equipment to be avilable, yet. It took me only 2 hours to update our HDMI driver with the 1.4a requirements, but from there it has to go to QA, a new driver release has to be scheduled by the integration team, and then the manufacturer's engineers also have to evaluate the changes, and finally put the new features into their product (update the GUI, manuals, customer service, etc.). Then the updated products have to be manufactured and shipped to stores.


You can see how this takes at least a few weeks, if not months. Firmware updates might be available faster than updated products, since they don't have to go through the manufacturing phase.
 
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