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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I assumed that all movie DVDs were 30 fps. But it appears to me that "When Harry Met Sally" special edition is 24 fps.


Am I confused? I thought that 24 fps was reserved for video.


Are some movies shot at 24 fps? I really don't understand the distinction...


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oops! I meant to say, 24 fps is normally film, and 30 fps is normally video? :)


OK, I guess what I should have said is that Chicken Run seemed to be 30 fps, and When Harry Met Sally seemed to be 24 fps. So is Chicken Run the oddball? I guess most mainstream US region 1 movies are encoded on the DVD at 24 fps? Was Chicken Run shot at 30 fps, or was it shot at 24 fps, and digitially converted to 30 fps before encoding on the DVD?


Mike
 

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Mike,


Since Chicken Run was shown theatrically, you can bet it was photographed at 24 fps. 30 fps would have added even more work for the claymation (?) animators and would have complicated the theatrical release (films are shown in theaters at 24 fps on modern 35mm film).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mflaster
... I guess most mainstream US region 1 movies are encoded on the DVD at 24 fps? Was Chicken Run shot at 30 fps, or was it shot at 24 fps, and digitially converted to 30 fps before encoding on the DVD?


Mike
Almost all film runs at 24 fps and all NTSC DVDs at 30 fps or 60 half frames called fields per second. In order to fit film's 24 frames into video's 60 fields a process called 2:3 pulldown is used. For a good explanation go here .
 

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I'd be curious to see what "Oklahoma" looks like on DVD, as it was shot at 30fps in the Todd AO format (heard this on the Ebert & Roeper show last weekend).
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Karnis
I'd be curious to see what "Oklahoma" looks like on DVD, as it was shot at 30fps in the Todd AO format (heard this on the Ebert & Roeper show last weekend).
The original spec for the Todd AO was 30fps but was changed for compatibility reasons. Oklahoma was film, mastered and released in both 30 fps and 24 fps. If the 30 fps was used for the DVD this would be great as long as it did not contain film flags. If so you would need to force "BOB". Cleopatra and 2001 were also Todd AO films, but in the 24 fps only.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, to further reinforce my (lack of) credibility - it turns out that Chicken Run is 24 fps too!!!


I think the proper reply to my original post should have been:

Quote:
Originally posted by mflaster
Am I confused?
YES!




(Where's the tail-between-the-legs icon when you need it?)


Mike
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mflaster
So, to further reinforce my (lack of) credibility - it turns out that Chicken Run is 24 fps too!!!


I think the proper reply to my original post should have been:


YES!




(Where's the tail-between-the-legs icon when you need it?)


Mike
Chicken Run like 98% of all films is 24 fps. A DVD of film (and Chicken Run) runs at 30 fps with 2:3 pulldown to show the film (and the hens) at the correct speed. ;)
 

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So, if a movie is shot in HD or with all digital equipment, what would be the frame (or field) rate?


I am assuming if something is digital, it is defaulted to region standards. 29.97fps for NTSC and 25fps for PAL.


Regards,


-Warlock
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by 100Watt Warlock
So, if a movie is shot in HD or with all digital equipment, what would be the frame (or field) rate?


I am assuming if something is digital, it is defaulted to region standards. 29.97fps for NTSC and 25fps for PAL.


Regards,


-Warlock
It depends. Video at 1080i is a true 30fps and not NTSC's 29.97fps plus 720p and 1080p are at 60fps. However Lucas in his infinite wisdom has elected to have digital movies shot at the inferior 24fps when it should be 60fps to eliminate flicker and panning motion skip. Of course the reasoning is to be backwards compatible with current film editing equipment and software. But this new format could saddle us in the future with digital movies that could be inferior to your local news telecast.:(
 
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