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Everyone,

Are power conditioners worth the money? I don't know much about them.

I guess my question goes out to those who have had it both ways with the power conditioner and without. I'd like to hear what you have to say.
 

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I use a line conditioner because, during the summer months, my building's power circuits tend to be overtaxed and I get wildly variable power flow to my apartment.


If you have a stable and steady voltage supply, I would say that a line conditioner certainly doesn't hurt, but I am not of the camp that believes that a line conditioner can magically improve your sound or picture quality.


Like expensive cabling, this is of course a controversial matter with some people swearing up and down that spending lots of money on an accessory like this will radically improve your picture and sound. If you want to test it out, that's up to you.
 

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Josh Z,


Does a conditioner stabilize the power or do you need a voltage regulator for that? I'm confused on that issue and I do have some power issues in my c1900 house that causes my receiver to shut down sporadically.


jack
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by abuethan
yes the conditioner does regulate the power and sends a consistant 120v to your components.
I think it all depends on what conditioner you are talking about. Some conditioners are no more than a filter for RFI/EMI and provide surge supression and do not regulate the voltage at all.


I know that the PS Audio Power Plants do it all which means perfectly clean and regulated power for your components regardless of your powerline quality.


I use the P600 with my projector because I don't care for brown-outs and burnt power supplies. :)
 

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Try the tweaks forum. One company that has had consistently good reviews is www.bpt.com. I got the BP 2.5 and it seems to make a difference. I do not have any big claims to make, but I do have the satisfaction that all the equipment is receiving good clean power. It is very difficult to prove or disprove anything in this area.

-Jai
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by abuethan
yes the conditioner does regulate the power and sends a consistant 120v to your components.
Provided you have a consistant source of at least 120v.


I went around and around with my power co and APC about my having an avg 95v in this extreme rural area. Told APC I had a large budget for whatever it takes since I run several high end PCs.


APC's tech explained: There is no way to make constant 120v out of 95v.
 

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apc is wrong!


a good line conditioner will provide 120 volts constant line voltage....if your voltage is 95v, a GOOD LINE CONDITIONER will turn it into 120 volts....


the tech on the line must have been new......

www.tripplite.com


"Transformer-based voltage correction circuits maintain usable 120V nominal AC output during brownouts as low as 87V and overvoltages to 140V. "


russ
 

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Russ,


as far as I understand it, UPS (whether line-interactive, on-line or other type) can only offer continuous output voltage significantly above the input voltage as long as the battery capacity allows.


If you want to retain the same current output draw, you cannot offer 120V output, if the input to the UPS remains at 95 V (max) at all the times.


THat is, unless the UPS has a secondary source of power or infinite battery capacity.


As for the benefits that power conditioners (hifi type or UPS) can offer, you'll find a decent explanation from Powerware's web site:

http://www.powerware.com/Powerball.htm


As for what kind of differences can be noticed in various UPS devices on the market, the recent Digit Life test sheds some light on this:

http://www.digit-life.com/articles2/...2k2/index.html


The problem with many UPS devices is that they will increase the inductance of the AC as seen by power amps and make it harder for the amps to draw the required current during musical transients, possibly resulting in transient distortion.


Isotek Corporation Qube power conditioner is *supposed* to combat this problem:

http://www.ajg-av.co.uk/2k_qube.html


Also, be adviced that while RFI/EMI hash or harmonics in the input current may not be in the audible range of human hearing (and as such may appear to be unharmful), the audio playback chain is non-linear. Loudspeakers have been shown (measured and listened) to cause ultrasonic noise to interpolate down to audible frequencies and cause audible distortion (see Black's AES paper on Aliasing Intermodulation Distortion).


Of course the whole subject is more complicated than I present here and I don't claim to be an expert on the subject, but in my opinion power conditioning done right can audibly improve performance if the starting conditions are dismal enough.


regards,

Halcy
 

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I am not experienced in voltage conversions, but I would assume that 95 volts at higher amps can be converted to 120 volts at lower amps. This should be possible without battery power as long as there is enough wattage to power the device.
 

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I have some of those TrippLite LC2400 line conditioners in use, and they don't exactly produce 120 volts from 87 volts. It's more like a set correction value is applied to the incoming signal: ie 87 volts becomes ~106, 140 becomes ~128. My biggest complaint is that these boxes correct voltages in the 112-115 range to 125 volts, which seems odd to me. I contacted a tech who confirmed that they were supposed to function that way claiming 125 was better than 115, even though all my equipment is rated for 110-120v. Oh well, no damage to report and they seem to work well on heavily loaded down circuits.
 
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