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Would a projector give off more ambient light than a tv in the sense that it would light up less stuff that I don't want lit up? Namely everything that isn't the movie/screen?

 

 

I had a hard time coming up with anything, and I think it would be cool to be in a room that is 100% black other than the screen, I'm not sure if this is possible and if so how far away from the screen I would have to be perceive no ambient light. I was playing around with the idea of glasses/goggles that block out everything other than screen. That seems hard and not very practical though.
 

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Basically everything (tv or projector) with good viewing angles will be throwing light all around the room during bright scenes. Having flat (non-shiny) dark colored walls will help keep the room darker and less reflective, but it's not always possible. Likely, your best shot is to keep your image brightness under control by keeping the backlight low for an LCD, contrast setting conservative for a plasma, or using a darker screen/neutral density filter for a projector that's too bright..and use the movie/cinema mode which is often the darkest and most accurately colored/gamma'd mode.


A projector WILL probably be your most dim option that will light up the room the least. It is also the cheapest way to get a 110" screen, if you're after that sort of experience. I'd suggest finding a physical store with no restocking fee (bestbuy, walmart, etc.) where you can pick up or order a hometheater projector to try out. If you don't care for it, you're only out some gas money and the personal experience is both fun and educational.
 

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With a TV you can calibrate it for dark viewing to help reduce the amount of light. A projector is going to probably light up the room more depending on the projectors output and size and design of the screen. 2000+ lumen on a 110" standard grain white screen is going to be very bright on bright scenes. Most folks treat the room, after all have you ever been to a movie theater that has light colored anything in it?
 

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On a related note, does a 110"screen at 12ftL put out the same perceived light into a room as a 55"screen at 48ftL? Because if that's the case, I'd think a calibrated tv VS. a calibrated pj would be on pretty equal footing. If anyone knows the math for this (if there is such a thing) speak up.
 

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Flatpanels are much brighter than projectors, as is plain to see. You've got a comparable amount of source light output concentrated on a much smaller display area with flatpanels.


The modern LCDs (as well as the legacy CRT) displays used in professional video are/were so bright that SMPTE recommends adding supplemental backlighting in darkened rooms to diminish iris activity and reduce eyestrain. Phillips cleverly incorporated the backlighting into some of their early LCD displays.


However, projection systems typically do not match these intensity (and contrast) levels -- they often struggle to achieve sufficient brightness (especially with 3-D sunglasses).


16 fL is often cited as the reference for "sufficient brightness," but that's way below what LCDs will do and is more of a minimum requirement than a desired target for brightness.
 
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