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The 77" LG OLEDs are super tempting for me now that they take HDMI 2.1 and do 120hz. The problem is that we've gotten accustomed to our 135" screen with JVC NX7 in the bat cave. We have friends over to watch UFC regularly. For sports, the big screen just wins hands down. If JVC ever releases a projector that does 100hz or greater over HDMI 2.1, then I would ask "Are TVs dead?"
 

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Indeed, I stand corrected. But I think you get my point, that was a standard "thing" and for the most part did not change for a VERY long time in cinema's
I absolutely get your point and agree with you. That's why I always run the exact refresh rate that matches the frame rate of the source.
BTW there were a few (very few) exceptions to that 24 FPS rate in commercial cinema. Two that immediately come to mind were the 70mm versions of Oklahoma! and Around The World In 80 Days which were both 30 FPS.
 

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70mm versions of Oklahoma! and Around The World In 80 Days which were both 30 FPS
Oh, okay cool I did not know about those(y). Did you ever get to see them in a theater on those formats? That is cool and must have been a fun experience. I have heard their are others.

The cinema experience is a very dear to me thing. From a very young age and deeply founded in my family. People talk about movie theaters dyeing and will go "dead"(threads out there) due to Covid......... NO WAY. Hate to brake it to you guys out there, but life will go on at some point. The world has recovered from FAR worse things. No matter how tragic an event happens thought history, at some point people always want to just go back to a norm. Cinema's, concert halls and yes projectors are not going anywhere.
 

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Yes, I did. Both of them.... and all the 3 strip Cinerama films. My father was a theatre manager in Hawaii for 40 years, and I was a part time projectionist for 30+ years in multiple cities as I moved due to my primary career with IBM: Honolulu HI, Lexington KY, Boulder CO, Denver CO, and Minneapolis MN. My all time favorite theatres to work in were the Cooper Cinerama theatres in both Denver and Minneapolis.

My HT's have always been projection based (35mm, CRT, DLP, LCOS) with constant height screens for the last 50 years. I am currently using a JVC RS25 and a JVC RS57 using ISCO 1.5x anamorphic lenses projecting on a 145" wide 2.65:1 curved screen. Primary seating distance is about 7.5 feet.
 

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That is amazing, you have seen and worked on a lot of nice Cinemas! I think I might have been to the one Minneapolis MN. Some time back in the 2000-ish time frame if it is the same one you are talking about, maybe not I will look and come back with exact location.

EDIT: It was somewhere in Bloomington MN, but I could not find it anymore. Most likely not the one and closed LOL

HT's have always been projection based (35mm, CRT, DLP, LCOS)
Do you by any chance have pics, or even better a "build thread" somewhere? I and others here would love to see some pictures of that and your current setup. I worked in a really nice Cinema Theater Roanoke VA, when I was in my 20s but never owned any film-based projectors in any of my HT. My father did I think it was 22mm cant remember. That's really old-school cool man. I salute you.
 

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EDIT: It was somewhere in Bloomington MN, but I could not find it anymore. Most likely not the one and closed LOL
Yes, it was in Bloomington.
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Unfortunately, it is long gone along with most, if not all, of the theatres that I have worked in over my lifetime.

While I have had some pretty fancy HT installations over the years, retirement and a move to a smaller home has dictated a more minimalist approach to my current HT:(.

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with emphasis on performance over esthetics :geek:

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A screenshot in my current HT from a blu ray of "This Is Cinerama", the first Cinerama film released in 1952.
 

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Yes, it was in Bloomington.
View attachment 3119237

Unfortunately, it is long gone along with most, if not all, of the theatres that I have worked in over my lifetime.

While I have had some pretty fancy HT installations over the years, retirement and a move to a smaller home has dictated a more minimalist approach to my current HT:(.

View attachment 3119239

View attachment 3119242

View attachment 3119240

with emphasis on performance over esthetics :geek:

View attachment 3119241

A screenshot in my current HT from a blu ray of "This Is Cinerama", the first Cinerama film released in 1952.
I remember seeing 2001 and Gran Prix in Cinerama when they came out here in the St. Louis area. Unforgettable.
 

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I remember seeing 2001 and Gran Prix in Cinerama when they came out here in the St. Louis area. Unforgettable.
Yes, but that was Cinerama Lite. Neutered so it could be shown with one 70mm projector.

Every one of the original 3 strip Cinerama venues suffered a screen size reduction, primarily in width when it was converted to the single strip format.

There were two reasons for this:
3 strip Cinerama had a 2.65:1 projected aspect ratio while single strip was based on spherical 70mm at 2.20:1.

3 strip Cinerama ran 3 projectors, each with a carbon arc lamp house running roughly 100 amps using a 6 perforation high 35mm frame while single strip used a 5 perforation high 70mm frame with a single carbon arc lamphouse running at roughly 150 amps. This was very close to the maximum light energy that the film frame could support without causing focus problems due to film buckling as a result of heat.

The five original Cinerama travelogues, Brothers Grimm, How The West Was Won, plus Windjammer in Cinemiracle and Russian Adventure were all 3 strip and were truly unforgettable viewing experiences.
 

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Yes, but that was Cinerama Lite. Neutered so it could be shown with one 70mm projector.

Every one of the original 3 strip Cinerama venues suffered a screen size reduction, primarily in width when it was converted to the single strip format.

There were two reasons for this:
3 strip Cinerama had a 2.65:1 projected aspect ratio while single strip was based on spherical 70mm at 2.20:1.

3 strip Cinerama ran 3 projectors, each with a carbon arc lamp house running roughly 100 amps using a 6 perforation high 35mm frame while single strip used a 5 perforation high 70mm frame with a single carbon arc lamphouse running at roughly 150 amps. This was very close to the maximum light energy that the film frame could support without causing focus problems due to film buckling as a result of heat.

The five original Cinerama travelogues, Brothers Grimm, How The West Was Won, plus Windjammer in Cinemiracle and Russian Adventure were all 3 strip and were truly unforgettable viewing experiences.
Could have sworn there was more than one projector there, but of course that was long ago and I was a kid.
 

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Yes, it was in Bloomington.


Unfortunately, it is long gone along with most, if not all, of the theatres that I have worked in over my lifetime.
Yes, that was it! A very long time ago. What amazing sound stage they had too along with the Cinerama experience. It was such a nice space, sad that it is gone :( Your current HT set up is trully something special WoW, no way, thats what I said when I saw it. I assume you made that screen, curious what fabric did you used looks spandex-y? Not AT? are those all full film bag cases next to the speakers? Nice

I would love to see the blu ray of "This Is Cinerama" on that screen. It has been many years ago the last time I watched it.

Thank you for posting this(you should make Build thread over at the HT build section they would love to see this too) and I love those beasty 1.5x ALenes. I sold my ISCO IIIL back in 2013 I think. I still love the look on peoples face when they see a large anamorphic lens in someone's house for the first time. "Priceless"

70mm frame with a single carbon arc lamphouse running at roughly 150 amps. This was very close to the maximum light energy that the film frame could support without causing focus problems due to film buckling as a result of heat.

You clearly had a lot of experience over the years and know your stuff man(y). Did you ever experience an ignition event LOL? I saw the aftermath of one. I never work with 70mm or even got close to one. The things you probably have seen.......well, I am sure you got some good story's?


Anyways, would you say you miss the work? And if so what parts of that experience was your favorite?
 

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I assume you made that screen, curious what fabric did you used looks spandex-y? Not AT? are those all full film bag cases next to the speakers? Nice
It's made from blackout drapery lining fabric. Unity gain screen. The binders contain media, DVD, Blu ray, & 4K.

Did you ever experience an ignition event LOL?
Nope, never had one, Started informal training in the projection booth in the theatres my Dad managed at age 11 around 1954 shortly after CinemaScope was introduced. Carbon arc was the norm for many years and required a lot of effort and skill to maintain proper color temperature on the screen. DC power for the lamp houses was supplied by motor - generators.

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Anyways, would you say you miss the work? And if so what parts of that experience was your favorite?
Yes I miss it. My favorite part was giving the audience a perfect show and delivering it with the best possible showmanship. No missed changeovers, the best possible focus, proper sound levels, maintaining even screen illumination, proper timing of house and curtain lighting, perfect timing on the curtains cues.
The ultimate goal was always to make sure the audience was never taken out of the performance by a technical issue.

It was called Showmanship back then and it largely disappeared when multiplexes began to proliferate.
 
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