AVS Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,347 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the latest issue of Widescreen Review John Bishop recommends Runco dealers use the following light levels for specifying projectors:


Screening Room 16-32 fL

Living Room 32-64 fL

Great Room 80-160 fL


Yeiks! "Kids when you're playing in the great room don't look into the projector or you'll sear your retinas into a chard mass!" How many Runco owners have permanently blinded themselves watching a 160 fL screen?


Seriously, do these seem a bit high? I know in my living room with just a reading lamp or two on watching a movie at 25 fL hurts my eyes. I couldn't imagine what watching at 32 fL would do. Given that you could watch a movie during the day with the windows open at 160 fL is it possible turn down the light output enough for evening viewing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,213 Posts
Keeping in mid that these are new lamp numbers that will drop in half - those are the ranges I would use with each room bracketed based on the amount of ambient light and margining for lamps, screens, specs being a WAG...But the low side of their range accounting for the lamp average is meeting SMPTE film&TV specs.


Replace them with averaged lamp life brightness and it is more reasonable - 12ftL for dedicated room - 24ftL if you want sconces on.


Also if you do contrast ratio at ambient math - you see you need some serious lumens


(ON+AMB)/(OFF+AMB)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,895 Posts
ARE RUNCO OWNERS BLIND????



No, just rich or if not have more disposable income that most of us
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,347 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by krasmuzik /forum/post/0


Also if you do contrast ratio at ambient math - you see you need some serious lumens


(ON+AMB)/(OFF+AMB)

I agree for day light viewing you need serious lumens. I've seen many commercial installations that use over 100 fL. But, in the home if you require over 100 fL for day viewing you're going to overpower night viewing (even with the lights on). I would think that due to the large variability of lighting conditions in a home it isn't practical to design for all lighting conditions.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top