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ALL CDs are sampled at 44.1KHz. Nyquist's theorem therefore dictates that the highest frequency that can be reproduced is 44.1/2=22.05KHz. Filters, being what they are, have some slope so it is pushing to get much useful material above 20KHz.
 

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Are you asking Compact Discs, Compression Drivers, or Constant Directivity whatevers...?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZilchLab /forum/post/18230651


Are you asking Compact Discs, Compression Drivers, or Constant Directivity whatevers...?

Take your pick, the reason why none of them really need to extend flat to 20kHz let alone beyond is because the others don't either.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleLee /forum/post/18231088


Better question, are there any ears?


I'm good until about 16-17ish, got tested.

Exactly, I may be slightly lower than that.

What is the point if only your dog can hear it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KyleLee /forum/post/18231088


Better question, are there any ears?


I'm good until about 16-17ish, got tested.

There was a thread about this over on the theory forum. Some people here higher.


There was an pro diver vs hifi driver thread over on diyaudio.com that had the > 15KHz discussion in it where it was a Geddes vs audiophile match. Very interesting discussion.


There are people that can hear > 20Khz and they think a system is lacking without.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray /forum/post/18233435


There are people that can hear > 20Khz and they think a system is lacking without.

It is interesting and there are undoubtedly people that can do so by a very slight amount, but how many, I am guessing a miniscule number.

Can the OP?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray /forum/post/18233435


There are people that can hear > 20Khz and they think a system is lacking without.

I'd say that there are people that think they can hear >20kHz is a more accurate assessment. The placebo effect applies to far more than silver cables and Magic Pebbles.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice /forum/post/18233477


I'd say that there are people that think they can hear >20kHz is a more accurate assessment. The placebo effect applies to far more than silver cables and Magic Pebbles.

That was my opinion too but some pretty objective types, confirmed there are some people that have the ability and they have proven it in actually tests. The ear has to ability to hear that high so who knows.


I do not care myself, I did a simple test and didnt hear much higher then 18Hz. I even ran filters with music to test if it matter. It didnt to me.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by penngray /forum/post/18233486


That was my opinion too but some pretty objective types, confirmed there are some people that have the ability and they have proven it in actually tests.

Mostly those under the age of 25. That accounts for the success of ultra-sonic 'teenager repellent' piezo tweeter/20kHz oscillator gizmos. Perhaps they'd also work as oddiophool repellents?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Fitzmaurice /forum/post/18233554


Mostly those under the age of 25. That accounts for the success of ultra-sonic 'teenager repellent' piezo tweeter/20kHz oscillator gizmos.

Exactly, that was going to be my post.


By the time we are over 20 we have had some degree of hearing loss only to continue with age.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmst3 /forum/post/18231132


Exactly, I may be slightly lower than that.

What is the point if only your dog can hear it?

I'm just curious as to why my dog hate hate high pitch sound in a scream or in some opera. He always go nuts and bark madly... poor lil guy. But then when I played movies with some low bass in a fairly loud volume, he slept through it... I always thought those rumbling and shaking noise would bother him more. Kinda interesting...


Sorry about the OT...


Al,
 

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If I was a dog I would tell you.



I am guessing they are more sensitive to certain freqs including the higher octaves and less so with the lower octaves.


My dog didn't seem to react to low bass either.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmst3 /forum/post/18234078


If I was a dog I would tell you.



I am guessing they are more sensitive to certain freqs including the higher octaves and less so with the lower octaves.


My dog didn't seem to react to low bass either.

Well my dog goes crazy during thunderstorms and any bass scene I have. She hides in the shower, she is an 80 pound golden retriever but she is a big baby





She actually goes crazy if I start opening up my equipment rack and tweeking, she hates when I test anything period
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wackii /forum/post/18233723


I'm just curious as to why my dog hate hate high pitch sound in a scream or in some opera. He always go nuts and bark madly... poor lil guy. But then when I played movies with some low bass in a fairly loud volume, he slept through it... I always thought those rumbling and shaking noise would bother him more. Kinda interesting...


Sorry about the OT...


Al,

Hearing is attuned to the needs of the user. As hunters of small animals, birds and the occasional insect hive canines need to hear high frequencies. Human hearing is most sensitive to the bandwidth of the human voice, as our first priority is communication.
 

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Ive seen it before somewhere. Does anyone have a chart of what different sounds range in the frequency spectrum. Meaning a cymbol is from x frequncy to x frequency, a male voice from x-x, etc.......? Kind of on topic with the rest of the discussion but not so much so i appologize. Its just something ive been wanting to take a look at again.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by reecew /forum/post/18235509


Ive seen it before somewhere. Does anyone have a chart of what different sounds range in the frequency spectrum. Meaning a cymbol is from x frequncy to x frequency, a male voice from x-x, etc.......? Kind of on topic with the rest of the discussion but not so much so i appologize. Its just something ive been wanting to take a look at again.

Audio Theory section

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...9#post18204509

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for the information. I agree with everyone about the lack of material => 20 khz. I'm just a little concerned about the roll off that begins fairly early in the upper range. I remember comparing speakers like B&W 800 series against Genelec designs & hearing quite a difference. At first I prefered the B&W's because it was laid back, musical , almost feather- like but still detailed. Specified response arround 30-40 k with the diamond tweeter. The Genelec sounded brighter but only extended to just over 20khz. Of course the Genelec's have a much narrower dispersion(focused- less room interaction) pattern because of their waveguides used. Some recordings with the Genelec sounded very bright some were absolutely terrific where you could tell everything on the B&W was a little too enhanced (my opinion). SO wouldn't it be great if a compression driver with all its benefits extend flat to 20khz with the choice to lower it a bit. I'll have to check out the thread about pro vs hifi for sure. What about high efficiency ribbons like the one from Beyma? Maybe the best of both worlds since no one really listens to an entire movie at >120db.
 
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