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If your talking about the ability to adjust the audio pitch, I believe the newer Malata's do. However, you will be limited to 2.0 audio when in effect.
 

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Hello :)


I've converted a couple of PAL DVD Videos to NTSC using a computer and then burning the end result to a DVD-R


Simply said ... it can be done and yes the quality is actually VERY good (assuming your PAL DVD video is progressive to begin with) but ... and this is a BIG but ... it takes a LONG time and the whole process is rather a pain in the ass.


Basically you have to rip the movie to your computer's HDD. Then you have to use DVD2AVI to get your AC-3 audio files and a d2v project file. Then you have to run the audio through a program (called BeSweet) that will slow it down from 25fps to 23.976fps. Then you have to use an avisynth script (which can be created with Gordian Knot and then hand edited if need be) to feed into a mpeg2 encoder (I use TMPGEnc Pro) to get your video. You then join the video and audio together in a DVD authoring program (you need to use one that supports AC-3 otherwise it will convert to MP2 sound). Last burn your DVD-R


Despite the fact that you are doing an mpeg2 re-encoding the end result, in the two and now a third attempt I am in the middle of, have been excellent. The resulting picture quality is BETTER than what a stand alone DVD player can do with real-time PAL to NTSC conversion and of course this is a true conversion to 24fps (well actually 23.976fps for the tech heads). However, it can take a VERY long time and so far only really works if the PAL DVD video is progressive. Just to give you an idea, I did a movie that was about 1h 45m and it took my friend's computer (mine would die doing this) about 17 hours to do a 2 Pass VBR encode with TMPGEnc. This was a 2.4Ghz P4 with 512MB and running WinXP home.


The benefit of this process of course is that once done you have a DVD-R that is region free, copy protection free and of course most importantly now in the NTSC format. No need to worry about it only working on a DVD player that can do conversion. Secondly, I feel that the picture quality is actually better but so far the longest movie I've done was a good 15 minutes shy of 2 hours so if it the movie is very long you may have to split the movie and put it on two DVD-R discs to retain prestine picture quality. Please note that this method is a true conversion from 25fps to progressive 24fps (or 23.976fps). Also, this will retain the original AC-3 track ... what I mean is if the original was 5.1 the new track will still be 5.1 but again you must use an authoering program that supports AC-3 and right now only a few do (I used SpruceUp so far for this).


If you or anyone else is interested I can include a more detailed method of doing this as well as my avisynth script (a script I got some on-line help with as it contains some "magic" or otherwise stuff I don't understand hehehe but is needed to change formats from PAL to NTSC).


- John "FulciLives" Coleman


P.S.

I recently discovered another way of doing this with a movie that had selectable subtitles. Although I've been told it is possible I've yet to figure out how to convert subs from a 25fps source to match a 23.976fps converted source so my solution was to first make a 25fps DivX (using 1-pass quality based 100% quality setting) from the original, adding borders above and below the widescreen image making it full screen (640x480 is standard full screen for DivX) and BURNING the subtitles into that DivX video. Then I converted the DivX to 23.976fps (easy to do and results in no quality loss) and then re-encoded it with TMPGEnc Pro which gave me a standard 720x480 NTSC mpeg2 file. I was afraid this would hurt the final outcome since I did the extra step of DivX conversion (along with the 720 width to 640 width back to 720 width) but I was thrilled that it turned out looking most excellent. This was a Japanese movie from Holland so the English subtitles were selectable since it also had Dutch subtitles. My final DVD has the English subs burned in but since the film is in Japanese I would never watch it without the subs anyways so no biggie there and of course I don't need the Dutch subs so it all worked out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a lot for the very detailed guide! I will give it a try, tho i doubt this is something I'm gonna bother with often.. :(


It's just amazing that it obviously has to be this complicated... With displays as projectors and TVs with more modes, a lot of todays European display devices should be able to run in a mode compatible with 24fps, so that we don't get the speedup. I must say I'm disappointed with the current dvd player manufacturers for ignoring this when they add lots of other small and big features to their products...
 

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Hello



OK here is the avs script that I use. I highly recommend that you install the newest version of Gordian Knot (download from www.doom9.org ) so that you have all the files that you need. Please note that some file names and directories in my script may be different for you depending on where you install Gordian Knot and where you keep your d2v file.


OK here is the avs script:

Quote:
#

# Created with Gordian Knot

#

# http://thewef.nav.to

#

# PLUGINS

# get them from http://users.win.be/dividee

LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\mpeg2dec.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\decomb.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\InverseTelecine.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\Avisynth_Spatial.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\GreedyHMA.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\WINDOWS\\SYSTEM\\vobsub.dll")

#LoadPlugin("C:\\PROGRA~1\\GORDIA~1\\SimpleResize.dll")

#

# SOURCE

mpeg2source("D:\\VIDEO_TS\\pal2ntsc.d2v")

#

# TRIM

#trim(startframe,endframe)

#

# IVTC

#Telecide()

#Decimate(cycle=5)

# or use

#InverseTelecine(40,10,15)

#GreedyHMA(1,0,4,0,0,0,0,0)

#

# DEINTERLACING (1)

#FieldDeinterlace()

#

# CROPPING

#crop(0,0,720,576)

#

# DEINTERLACING (2)

#VerticalReduceBy2

# or maybe

#GreedyHMA(1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0)

#

#

# SUBTITLES

#VobSub("FileName")

#

# RESIZING

#BicubicResize(720,480,0,0)

#

# DENOISING: choose one combination (or none)

# 1) little noise (fast)

#TemporalSmoother(2,1)

#

# 2) medium noise (slow)

#SpatialSoftenMMX(1,4,6,false,false,4,4,6,8)

#TemporalSmoother(2)

#

# 3) heavy noise (very slow, you have been warned)

#SpatialSoftenMMX(2,4,6,false,false,4,4,6,8)

#TemporalSmoother(3)

#SpatialSoftenMMX(1,4,6,false,false,4,4,6,8)

#

# BORDERS

#AddBorders(left,top,right,bottom)

#

# COMPRESSIBILITY CHECK

# !!!!Snip Size now has to be 14 for use in GKnot!

#SelectRangeEvery(280,14)

#

# FOOL CCEnc

#ResampleAudio(44100)

function ReverseFields(clip clip, int "ShiftDown")

{

LoadVirtualdubPlugin("ReverseFields.vdf", "_ReverseFields")

return clip._ReverseFields(default(ShiftDown,1))

}

ComplementParity

SeparateFields

Weave

ConvertToRGB32.ReverseFields

BicubicResize(720,480)

AssumeFPS(23.976)
Please note that I have included the file "ReverseFields.vdf" as an attachment. It is in the ZIP format. After you unzip it you will have a single file called "ReverseFields.vdf"

Each time I do this process (I've done it twice so far and both successfully) I simply copy the ReverseFields.vdf file into the same DIR as the ripped movie files. I also put the avs script above as well as the d2v project file in the same DIR (including the AC-3 audio files that DVD2AVI creates).


So basically you rip the DVD using DVD Decrypter and then use DVD2AVI to create a d2v project file (called "pal2ntsc.d2v" in my example script above) then feed this script into the TMPGEnc Pro encoder. Make sure you set (if I recall correctly) the VIDEO ARRANGE METHOD option to FULL SCREEN (KEEP ASPECT RATIO 2) and your aspect ratio should be correct. I'm pretty sure this is the setting I used on my two tests and one was widescreen and one was full screen and both came out at the correct aspect ratio using that setting.


As for sound you need to download the newest BETA versions of BeSweet and BeSweet GUI both of which can be found on the DOOM9 web site (I think to get to the BeSweet website you look in the LINKS section of DOOM9). This program can then take the AC-3 file that DVD2AVI created and convert it from 25fps to 23.976fps (there is a built in preset for this using the BeSweet GUI). You can transcode from AC-3 to AC-3 or from AC-3 to WAV depending on what kind of authoring software you will be using. If your authoring software supports AC-3 then by all means do AC-3 to AC-3 otherwise do AC-3 to WAV and then feed the wave file into TMPGEnc when doing the above step which will then give you a mpeg2 video file as well as a MP2 sound file.


PLEASE NOTE

For reasons beyond my understanding I have found that some stand alone DVD players have problems with the above proceedure if you go from a 2.0 AC-3 to a 2.0 AC-3 audio file. I don't know if the problem is with BeSweet or the authoring program I used (SpruceUP). However, I have yet to find a DVD player that has problems with the converted AC-3 if I went from a 5.1 AC-3 to a 5.1 AC-3 audio file. The problem some DVD players have is that they will either "lock up" with the 2.0 AC-3 or they will have stuttering playback. This happened with a very old model Pioneer and a Samsung 5 disc changer (about 3 years old). My Panasonic RV-32 and my Cyberhome CH-500 DVD players had no problems with either 5.1 or 2.0 AC-3 playback. As I said before this was done on a computer and burned to a 2x Maxell DVD-R disc using a Pioneer A04 DVD burner.


Good Luck!


- John "FulciLives" Coleman


P.S.

Remember all the software you need can be downloaded from www.doom9.org but don't forget to download the ReverseFields.zip file I have set as an attachment here. Also please note that the above will only work correctly if the original PAL DVD video is progressive. Don't panic if DVD2AVI tells you that the source is interlaced ... it seems to do this with all PAL video sources but in my experience very few PAL DVD videos are not progressive (unless it was something originally shot-on-video).

 

reversefields.zip 15.9853515625k . file
 

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Damn.. I just bought Canopus Procoder for the converting... :eek:


I just started experimenting with it.. The results look fine by me..


Do you think I would get better results with DVD2Avi..??


What I do now is Rip the DVD.. Make an avi.. and then recompile with Procoder..


The advantage I have is that I also have a lot of analog video that I can capture with my Pinnacle card and convert those avi's as well..
 
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