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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,


I've had a Kenwood AX-7 system for a while now, but I've never really known if the specs are "good" or not. I know about frequency response and a little about sensitivity, but not so much about THD. I think 0.002% THD is good, but 10% seems too much. Can someone please explain?


I'm more inclined to hearing the sound produced rather than looking at the specs other than to find the frequency response, but it would be a good feeling to know what all the numbers mean.


Any response greatly appreciated,


e.E.
 

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Some spec sheets try to tell you how good the product is. Some spec sheets try not to tell you how bad the product is. Yours is in the second category. The giveaway is that they're speccing power and distortion at a single frequency, rather than over the entire audible bandwidth.


Which doesn't mean you should throw it out. It may deliver fine sound for the money you paid. But I hope you didn't pay much.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnarus /forum/post/16959290


Some spec sheets try to tell you how good the product is. Some spec sheets try not to tell you how bad the product is.

Very well put. May I use that?
 

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Interesting specs. I would not worry about the 10% because that s for a sine wave at full power, not listening to music. Seeing how clean it says it is at half power is a better hint on how it will actually sound. Your inclination to listen rather than play spec games is wise.


Thank the Government for eliminating the standard FTC spec's we used to have. They had to post maximum THD and S/N at rated power 20 to 20. Not that that told you much, but at least it told you the same thing. In those days, they would have called it a 30W amp and it would probability be in the .1% range. Everybody wants to see giant power numbers these days, so fun with specs. ( My amp is bigger than your amp)
 

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Unless I'm mistaken, I thought that for stereo, 2-channel amplification products (not multi-channel) the requirements were still in place. I don't recall any rescinding of the regulations for 2-channel. For multi-channel it changed. If that's the case, there's a few manufacturers out there that don't play by 2-channel rules.
 

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Seeing how clean it says it is at half power is a better hint on how it will actually sound.

But that's the point. It doesn't tell you that, or anything else that would be useful. For the power spec, it pumps up the distortion in order to claim the highest possible power. And for the distortion spec, it measures at only one frequency, to minimize distortion.


Now it looks like this is a HTiB, so these kinds of numbers are probably par for the course. And depending on the attached speakers, it might even sound OK. (Then again, the distortion in the speakers may so far outweigh that of the amp that the latter problem isn't important.)


The bottom line is, if this is what you've got, and/or what you can afford, and it sounds good (enough) to you, then be happy and enjoy the music. And don't worry about the meaningless specs they give you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chu Gai /forum/post/16961241


Unless I'm mistaken, I thought that for stereo, 2-channel amplification products (not multi-channel) the requirements were still in place. I don't recall any rescinding of the regulations for 2-channel. For multi-channel it changed. If that's the case, there's a few manufacturers out there that don't play by 2-channel rules.

I have not seen the standard specs on anything for years. Maybe it is just ignored or maybe I am looking in the wrong place. Most companies don't mess with the FTC as it is very expensive to ship stuff back to China.


Maybe they have invented new laws in physics, so the little "300W per channel" 12 volt amps I use can actually produce more than the 12W that conventional laws would imply.
 

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I have not seen the standard specs on anything for years.

I seem to recall that one thing that's changed is that retailers no longer have to use the standard specs. So even if a manufacturer lists them on its Web site and product literature, the consumer may never see them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Usually the amount of power a system has doesn't worry me as long as it goes loud enough for the times when I want to turn it up. Of course, this means handling bass to about the same level that the speakers can handle. Currently 50W into 85db/m is enough for me in my 6*3m room. I don't usually go past 40/80 (logarithmic reference volume?!) anyway.


Also, the system would be classed as "multi-channel", whether this changes much I don't know.


I'm more of a fan of the actual speakers than the electronics part, and the speakers have performed well for what they are. I think that about 65% of the cost of the product would have been the amp/pre-amp, which is one of those "play everything" types.


On a side note, there should be a receiver/pre-amp that has everything (that isn't a PC). All the ones I've seen always have something missing that another features.


Thanks for everyone's replies - when I get my next system, which won't be for a while, I'll probably do it myself instead of buying straight from a elec. goods store. Despite this, it sure beats most of the other plastic c-r-a-p that exists in those type of stores.
 
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